In Death of a Salesman, what is the relationship between Linda and Willy? How does Linda view her relationship with Willy? How does Willy view and treat Linda? Do his actions have an impact on Biff and Happy and how they view women?

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Linda and Willy have a complicated marriage, where their real issues are continually overlooked, and their emotions are suppressed. While both Linda and Willy love each other, each character has their own specific way of demonstrating their love. Linda understands Willy's shortcomings but remains by his side as a supportive,...

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Linda and Willy have a complicated marriage, where their real issues are continually overlooked, and their emotions are suppressed. While both Linda and Willy love each other, each character has their own specific way of demonstrating their love. Linda understands Willy's shortcomings but remains by his side as a supportive, understanding partner. She also entertains Willy's fantasies in order to not hurt his feelings and gently brings up serious issues in a way to avoid Willy's violent temper. Linda continually worries about Willy's mental health but is too afraid to confront her husband about his suicidal tendencies out of fear that she will upset or embarrass him. Linda also refers to Willy as "a little boat looking for a harbor" and encourages Biff and Happy to be nice to their father.

Willy does not reciprocate Linda's feelings and finds it difficult to express his love for her. Willy continually loses his patience with Linda and yells at her whenever he gets upset, which is something that Biff criticizes his father for doing. Willy is rather inconsiderate, insensitive, and borderline abusive towards Linda. Willy seems unappreciative of Linda and tries his best to maintain a resolute, optimistic disposition at all times. However, there are times when Willy shows his true feelings and confides in Linda. He also feels guilty for cheating on her with the Woman in Boston, which is why the memory continues to haunt him.

Both of Willy's sons disrespect and degrade women in the play. As an adolescent, the girls at school complained about Biff being too aggressive with them, and Happy carries on numerous affairs with the wives of his bosses. Given Willy's infidelity and unfair treatment of Linda, one could argue that Biff and Happy were negatively influenced by their father to use women and treat them disrespectfully. Willy never corrected their behavior as adolescents, and Biff and Happy grew up to be immature, inconsiderate men. Biff and Happy seem to share their father's outlook on women and treat them as convenient objects, which reflects Willy's treatment of Linda.

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