In chapter 7, what was so unusual about the baseball game?

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The first unusual thing about the baseball game in chapter 7 is the pitcher, John McNab. McNab, a twelve-year-old "giant," strikes out sixteen batters in a row "to set a new Two Mills L. L. record." There is "only one pitch he ever (throws): a fastball." Even after the game,...

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The first unusual thing about the baseball game in chapter 7 is the pitcher, John McNab. McNab, a twelve-year-old "giant," strikes out sixteen batters in a row "to set a new Two Mills L. L. record." There is "only one pitch he ever (throws): a fastball." Even after the game, McNab stays on the mound and makes the players who are still around step up to bat. He throws strike after strike until he has struck out thirty-five batters in a row.

The second unusual thing about the baseball game in chapter 7 is the "punky, runty little kid" who steps up to the plate to face McNab. This "kid" is "somebody new," who nobody has seen before and has "no Red Sox or Green Sox uniform." When McNab pitches to this kid, he strikes the ball "on a beeline right out to McNab's head." McNab pitches the ball three more times, and three more times the new kid strikes it for a home run. McNab, enraged, substitutes the baseball for a live frog and pitches the frog towards the new kid.

McNab falls to the floor laughing, but then realizes that the kid has "bunted the frog." And this is the third unusual thing about the baseball game. The kid tries for, and achieves "an inside-the-park home run bunt." This is described as "the rarest feat in baseball, something that had hardly ever been done with a ball, and never with a frog."

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