In chapter 7 of the novel The Outsiders, what does Randy say kids want from their parents?

In chapter 7 of The Outsiders, Randy says that what kids want from their parents is for them to lay down the law, set the limits, and give them something solid to stand on.

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Randy Adderson is a prominent Soc member and close friend of Bob Sheldon, who was tragically killed in an altercation with Johnny and Ponyboy. Unlike the other members of his Soc crew, Randy Adderson is sensitive enough to share his feelings with Ponyboy. Even though Ponyboy is a rival greaser, Randy is comfortable expressing his genuine emotions and confides in Ponyboy that he will not be attending the upcoming rumble. Randy is sick of the violence and doesn't believe that fighting solves anything.

Randy then elaborates on Bob Sheldon's home life and upbringing, which gives Ponyboy significant context into the lives of Socs as well as Bob's personal struggles. According to Randy, Bob's parents "spoiled him rotten" and gave in to him all the time. In Randy's opinion, Bob kept trying to make his parents say "No" and they never did. Randy genuinely believes all his buddy truly wanted was for his parents to set limits and "lay down the law."

He even recalls a time when Bob came home visibly intoxicated and thought his parents were "gonna raise the roof." Instead of severely reprimanding their son, Bob's parents took all the blame and never punished him. Randy goes on to tell Ponyboy, "If his old man had just belted him—just once, he might still be alive."

Unfortunately, Bob's parents allowed him to get away with anything and everything, which eventually led to his tragic death. Randy is a firm believer in discipline and feels Bob would still be alive if his parents held him responsible for his actions. He also believes Bob's destructive behavior was a cry for help and that he acted out, hoping his parents would intervene and discipline him.

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Randy Anderson may be a Soc, but he's not above talking to greasers, at least when there's a big rumble in the offing and they're able to chat without killing each other.

So before the big fight, he approaches Ponyboy and tells him he didn't think that a greaser would be able to do something like saving kids from a fire, as Ponyboy had done. Ponyboy replies that his being a greaser had nothing to do with it; Randy would most probably have done the same thing had he been in the same situation.

Randy then changes the subject. He's not going to show up at the rumble; he's sick and tired of all the fighting. Besides which, he's feeling bad about his deceased friend Bob. Randy blames Bob's parents for his death. If only they'd disciplined him properly, he'd still be alive. But they didn't; they spoiled him rotten and let him get away with murder. Even when he came home drunk one night, they blamed themselves rather than their son.

Randy claims that all Bob wanted was for his parents to say "No"—to have someone lay down the law, set the limits, give him something solid to stand on. In fact, he goes on to say, this is what "we" all want—"we" meaning kids.

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Randy Adderson, a Soc who drives a fancy blue Mustang, tells Ponyboy that Bob's parents spoiled him too much and gave him everything he wanted. Randy says about Bob, "He kept trying to make someone say 'No.'" According to Randy, Bob's parents never said no to him, even though Bob wanted them to. He believes that kids want their parents to set limits and to "give them something solid to stand on." In other words, kids want their parents to give them firm rules to follow.

He tells Ponyboy that once, Bob came home really drunk and expected his parents to get really upset about it. Instead, the parents thought it was their fault and blamed themselves for what had happened. They accepted the blame for the situation and did not punish him. Randy believes that if Bob's father had hit him just once, Bob wouldn't be dead. Randy tells Ponyboy what he thinks because he says none of his parents would understand what he's saying. 

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In Chapter 7 of The Outsiders, Randy Adderson is having a conversation with Ponyboy in his blue Mustang outside of the Tasty Freeze. Randy begins by telling Ponyboy that he admires his courage for saving the children in the burning church. Randy then explains to Pony that he is sick of the senseless gang violence, and he misses his close friend Bob Sheldon. After he laments about the death of his friend, Randy begins to explain Bob's home life. He says that Bob's parents gave him whatever he asked for and let him do whatever he wanted. Randy tells Pony that Bob kept trying to get his parents to say "no" to him, but they never did. Randy comments that all the boys really want is for their parents to "lay down the law," and set limits, in order to "give them something to stand on." (Hinton 116) He says that every time Bob would get into trouble, Bob's parents would blame themselves and never discipline him. Randy believes that if Bob's parents ever disciplined him, that Bob would still be alive today. Randy is trying to convey to Pony that the majority of his friends' parents allow their children to do whatever they want. Chastening your child is sign a love. Parents who set boundaries for their children care about them. Discipline can have positive outcomes and would have saved Bob's life if he understood that he had boundaries.

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