In chapter 7 of The Grapes of Wrath, how does Steinbeck describe the used car salesman? Which quote foreshadows the nature of the California dream?

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In chapter 7, the car salesman is characterized by a running monologue . It in, he reveals that he will do anything to close a sale. He does not mind cheating and emotionally manipulating people if it means they will leave the lot in one of his jalopies. He...

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In chapter 7, the car salesman is characterized by a running monologue. It in, he reveals that he will do anything to close a sale. He does not mind cheating and emotionally manipulating people if it means they will leave the lot in one of his jalopies. He has at least one colleague, Joe, and together, they know all the ways to make a worn-out car seem like it is roadworthy, if only long enough to get their customers off the lot with it.

The dirty business of cheating people to make a quick buck does not seem to bother him. He depersonalizes his customers, referring to them as "piker" and "dumb bunny," likely because it makes it easier on his conscience. The hard financial times have likely made him callous, and at the end of the day, they make him as desperate as the people who come to the lot looking for a deal.

The salesman and many of his customers believe that getting to California will be their economic salvation. He hears a man say, "I got to get a car. We're goin' to California. I got to get a car." The car salesman goes on to use this man's assertion as a sales pitch. He asks "Goin' to California? Here's jus' what you need." The vague promise of an abundant future with California as a kind of El Dorado becomes the vague promise of a dubious automobile to transport them to their future security.

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