In chapter 6 of Night, how did Zalman die?

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In Chapter Six of Night, the prisoners are forced to run through the snow "like automatons" by SS forces; anyone who slows down is shot to death, an act in which the SS takes great pleasure.

Zalman, a young Polish boy who had worked at an electrical material depot in Buna, starts experiencing stomach cramps. Elie encourages him to keep running, telling him that the SS cannot make the prisoners "run like this to the end of the world." Zalman cannot bear the pain; he undoes his buttons and lowers his pants, then drops to the ground.

Although Elie cannot be sure, he believes that Zalman must have been trampled under the running crowd of prisoners behind them who dared not stop to help the boy lest they themselves be killed.

In a tragic moment that summarizes the depths of depravity that prisoners of the Holocaust had to endure, Elie unemotionally states, "I soon forgot him. I began to think of myself again."

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Chapter six of Night finds the prisoners being forced on a march. There are having to march in a blizzard. They end up marching 42 miles. Zalman, a fellow prisoner, is running beside Elie. He complains of stomach cramps and wants to stop. Elie begs him to keep running, because if the SS were to see any of them not running, they would kill them. Zalman says he can't keep going and squats to the ground. Elie says that he never sees him again. Zalman was trampled by the other prisoners.

Elie has an injured foot, but keeps up the pace for his father. They are running together and keep each other going. Zalman was killed because the prisoners were afraid to stop. Elie says that if the SS saw any of them stop running they would kill them. The prisoners were so afraid of the SS that they trampled over one of their own, just to keep the German officers from killing them. 

This march shows us the strength that Elie has. He is injured, but pushed himself for the sake of this father. He sees Zalman go to the ground, and knowing he would never see him again, he still has the strength to keep going. The human will is a force all its own. Elie has the desire deep inside of him to survive, although all around him is nothing but death.

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In chapter six of "Night," we find the Jews on a forced march in the snow.  The SS made all of the prisoners increase their speed.  They were running and some of them couldn't keep up.  If they dropped out and were seen by the SS they were killed.  Zalman was a "young Polish lad" who was marching beside Elie.  As they were running Zalman begins to cry out in pain saying that his stomach is in pain.  Elie tries to encourage him on but Zalman drops his pants and squats down.  Elie tells us that he was not killed by the SS because they didn't see Zalman go down. 

"The last picture I have of him... I do not think it can have been the SS who finished him, because no one had notice. He must have been trampled to death beneath the feet of the thousands of men who followed us."

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Zalman is one of Elie's fellow inmates at Auschwitz. One night, the two men, along with other prisoners, are taken on a grueling forced march by the SS in the middle of a blizzard. It's hard enough to complete such a march at the best of times, but it's even worse when you're permanently hungry and riddled with disease. That's what's happened to Zalman. He's experiencing agonizing stomach pains and doesn't think he can go on. Elie desperately urges him on, knowing that if Zalman stops he'll be finished off by the Germans for sure. But Zalman has given up the ghost and squats to the ground in pain. He is then trampled to death by the other prisoners. It's a sign of just how terrified of the Germans the inmates are that they keep on marching without stopping, even though it causes the death of one of their own.

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In Elie Wiesel’s book Night, he describes a march out of a concentration camp that is about to be shut down near the end of the war. The prisoners are all running in a mob through the snow in the night, surrounded by guards who will shoot any who fall out of line. A young boy from Poland named Zalman is running beside Elie at one point during this march. The boy begins to exclaim that his stomach is aching and he cannot go on. Elie tries to convince him to continue, but he begins to undo his pants and yells that “My stomach is bursting” (86). Zalman drops his pants and falls over, and according to Elie’s assumptions, is trampled by the others. Readers can assume from the context that the physical assault on prisoners’ bodies often resulted in damaged and diseased digestive functions. Zalman’s stomach pains and actions were most likely indicative of a desperate need to void his bowels.

Wiesel, Elie. 'Night'. Trans. Marion Wiesel. New York: Hill and Wang, 2006. Book.

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During the winter of 1945, not long before the work camp at Buna is liberated by the Russians, Wiesel and his father are evacuated. The evacuation is basically a forced death march from Poland to the German concentration camp at Buchenwald, where Wiesel's father dies and Wiesel himself is ultimately freed.

Wiesel, who was only 15 at the time, has a badly infected foot and is barely able to keep up as the SS guards drive the men relentlessly through the snow with threatening words such as "swine" and "filthy sons of bitches." Any man who could not keep up the pace was shot by the guards. For a time a young man named Zalman marches beside Wiesel until he is overcome with stomach cramps and needs badly to relieve himself. Despite Wiesel's pleas for Zalman to keep going, the boy eventually stops and pulls down his pants to purge the waste that has caused his spasms. Wiesel reports that it was the last time he ever saw Zalman. He believes the boy was probably trampled to death rather than being shot by the SS.

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