In chapter 10 of In the Heat of the Night, what 3 characteristics of Chief Gillespie are given?

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In chapter 10 of his 1965 mystery novel, In The Heat of the Night, author John Ball recounts that, as a boy, the Texas-born Bill Gillespie (Chief of Police for the city of Wells, South Carolina) was "considerably bigger than his classmates and the other children with whom he...

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In chapter 10 of his 1965 mystery novel, In The Heat of the Night, author John Ball recounts that, as a boy, the Texas-born Bill Gillespie (Chief of Police for the city of Wells, South Carolina) was "considerably bigger than his classmates and the other children with whom he associated." He used his size to "impose his will" on the other children, but, to his credit, he hadn't become a bully and didn't deliberately "pick on" those who were smaller than him or disagreed with him.

Even though Gillespie was a natural leader, he lacked diplomacy. He admired people who stood up to him—including Sam Wood, who Gillespie had arrested on suspicion of murder earlier that evening—but Gillespie still had a powerful need to always be right, even in the face of evidence to the contrary.

Gillespie wasn't sure that he was right in arresting Sam. He was plagued by doubts, and he wished he had better evidence to support his suspicions about Sam. Gillespie worried that he wasn't up to the task of finding that evidence, and he was having serious second thoughts about taking the job of Chief of Police: "a job he was not properly qualified to fill."

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