In Animal Farm, what is an example of the social context?

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One example of the social context of Animal Farm is rooted in the early-20th-century history of Russia, particularly its October Revolution of 1917. The roots of this revolution begin in the early part of that year when the Russian monarch, Tsar Nicholas II, abdicated. In the wake of his abdication,...

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One example of the social context of Animal Farm is rooted in the early-20th-century history of Russia, particularly its October Revolution of 1917. The roots of this revolution begin in the early part of that year when the Russian monarch, Tsar Nicholas II, abdicated. In the wake of his abdication, the country formed a provisional government which was led by Alexander Kerensky who became the first prime minister.

In October of that fateful year, however, Kerensky was ousted and the Bolsheviks seized control of Russia. They were headed by Vladimir Lenin who became the Chief Commissar. The Bolsheviks were Socialists who promised "Peace, Bread and Land" to the Russian people - much like the message of Old Major's speech in Chapter One - and abolished private poverty in a bid to redistribute Russia's wealth.

While Orwell was a committed Socialist himself, he did not believe that the Russian Revolution promoted the true spirit of Socialism nor did it bring peace and prosperity to the Russian people. We see this directly through the Stalinist Purges of the 1930s in which murder and violence became commonplace throughout Soviet Russia, much like Napoleon's cull of the animals in Chapter Seven. 

This is only one example of Animal Farm's social context but it is an important one because it demonstrates Orwell's message and transforms his novel from a simple story to a socio-political allegory

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