In act 5, scene 1 of The Taming of the Shrew, how does Vincentio feel when he realizes that his identity has been stolen?

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Vincentio's first reaction is incredulity. He is rather slow to work out what is happening and cannot quite believe that the pedant would have the audacity to impersonate him to his face. This disbelief turns to indignation when Biondello corroborates the pedant's story. In his anger, he starts to beat...

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Vincentio's first reaction is incredulity. He is rather slow to work out what is happening and cannot quite believe that the pedant would have the audacity to impersonate him to his face. This disbelief turns to indignation when Biondello corroborates the pedant's story. In his anger, he starts to beat Biondello. This, of course, only serves to confirm the general impression that he is insane.

At this point, Vincentio notices Tranio. At first, he is aggrieved to see a servant so splendidly dressed. His first assumption is that Lucentio and Tranio have been spending his money in a profligate manner. However, he becomes much more distraught when the pedant who is impersonating him claims Tranio as his son, Lucentio. It is at this point that Vincentio's anger turns to fear. He thinks that Tranio has murdered his son in order to impersonate him for profit.

Fear and fury are equally apparent in Vincentio's response as he is about to be carried off to prison. At this point, however, the real Lucentio appears and acknowledges Vincentio as his father. Vincentio must be thoroughly relieved since he forgives his son for changing places with Tranio immediately. However, he is unwilling to extend this magnanimity to the servant who failed to acknowledge him. He declares:

I'll slit the villain's nose, that would have sent me to the gaol [jail].

Vincentio runs a gamut of emotions ranging from incredulity to anger to fear to relief. By the end of the scene, he is determined to revenge himself on Tranio.

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