In Act 4 of The Crucible, what happens to Reverend Hale after the Salem witch trials?

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After initially supporting the Salem court and attempting to discover witches throughout the community, Reverend Hale experiences a dramatic change of heart in Act Three. In Act Three, Reverend Hale realizes that Danforth, Judge Hathorne, and Reverend Parris are corrupt officials, who are only interested in protecting their positions of...

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After initially supporting the Salem court and attempting to discover witches throughout the community, Reverend Hale experiences a dramatic change of heart in Act Three. In Act Three, Reverend Hale realizes that Danforth, Judge Hathorne, and Reverend Parris are corrupt officials, who are only interested in protecting their positions of authority. He ends up supporting John Proctor, Francis Nurse, and Giles Corey and denounces the proceedings after Proctor is arrested and charged with witchcraft. After quitting the court, Reverend Hale attempts to redeem himself by persuading innocent citizens to offer false confessions in order to save their lives. Tragically, he cannot persuade John Proctor into offering a false confession and fails to convince Danforth to postpone the executions. In his final attempt to save John's life, Hale begs Elizabeth to persuade her husband to change his mind. However, Elizabeth refuses to intervene and allows her husband to die a martyr. The play concludes with a final drum roll as Proctor is led to the gallows.

While Arthur Miller ends the play without elaborating on Reverend Hale's future, historical records reveal that Hale quit the court shortly after accusations were levied against his wife, Sarah, who was never officially charged or arrested. A few years after the witch trials, Sarah passed away and Reverend Hale wrote a book about the events that transpired in Salem entitled A Modest Inquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft.

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In the play, Hale does an about-face and changes his role in the trials.  Originally, Hale is brought in as an investigator who believes that he is doing the Lord's work.  As more and more are arrested, Hale begins to see that greed and revenge are fueling the accusations, not witchcraft.  He decries the trials in Act 3, and in Act 4 we learn he has left Salem for Andover, where the trials have been put to an end.  He returns to Salem only to try to convince some of the accused to confess in order to save themselves.

The real Reverend Hale also began to doubt the veracity of the trials, especially after his wife, Sarah was accused.

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