In act 2, scene 4, what warning does the Nurse give to Romeo?

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In this scene of comical relief in "Romeo and Juliet," the Nurse enters, followed by her servant Peter, who must carry some of the excessive material of her dress. Mercutio shouts that a sail is following. When the nurse asks for Romeo , he jokes about the Nurse. ...

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In this scene of comical relief in "Romeo and Juliet," the Nurse enters, followed by her servant Peter, who must carry some of the excessive material of her dress. Mercutio shouts that a sail is following. When the nurse asks for Romeo, he jokes about the Nurse.  To this jest, she replies rather crudely,

An a' speak anything against me, I'll take him down, an a'were lustier than he is and twenty such Jacks; and if I cannot, Ill find those that shall.

The nurse warns Romeo against leading Juliet into

a fool's paradise, it were a very gross kind of behavior, as they say. For, the gentlewoman is young, and therefore if you should deal double with her, truly it were an ill thing to be offered to any gentlewoman and very weak dealing. 

She tells Romeo that Juliet is very young and should not be deceived as it is most ungentlemanly.  Fiercely protective of Juliet, the nurse does enjoy learning that Juliet is in love, however; she relishes the marriage plans, and she is a very important messenger for both Juliet and Romeo.

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The Nurse warns Romeo to not trick Juliet into thinking that he loves her more than he actually does. This action is in line with her usual behavior, for she always acts in the interests of Juliet throughout the play. This is because the Nurse is shown to have been Juliet's primary caregiver from the very beginning of her life, even rivaling and perhaps surpassing Juliet's mother in terms of influence. Evidence supporting this perspective can be found in Act 1, Scene 3, where Lady Capulet initial dismisses the Nurse so that she may speak to her daughter alone, only to quickly change her mind and request that the Nurse stay and provide counsel. This behavior indicates that the Nurse is valued by Lady Capulet and Juliet as a source of wisdom, and the Nurse clearly understands her influence as shown in her warning to Romeo. The Nurse wants the best for Juliet, and before she facilitates Juliet's relationship with Romeo, she must first ascertain that Romeo's intentions are pure. 

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