In act 2, scene 3 of Julius Caesar, why did Caesar say he would go to the capitol?

Caesar goes to the capitol in act 2, scene 3 of Julius Caesar in order to flaunt himself as a strong leader and potentially receive the crown. Despite ominous prophecies, Caesar states that his appearance could scare his enemies into hiding.

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It is in act two, scene two, that Julius Caesar explains why he will go to the Capitol against his wife's wishes. At the beginning of the scene, Calphurnia begs Caesar to stay at home and he responds by saying,

"Caesar shall forth. The things that threatened me Ne'er looked...

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It is in act two, scene two, that Julius Caesar explains why he will go to the Capitol against his wife's wishes. At the beginning of the scene, Calphurnia begs Caesar to stay at home and he responds by saying,

"Caesar shall forth. The things that threatened me Ne'er looked but on my back. When they shall see The face of Caesar, they are vanishèd" (2.2.10-13).

Caesar's comments portray him as a bold, confident man who fears nothing and is determined to do as he pleases. Calphurnia responds by commenting on several foreboding omens, which motivated her to warn Caesar about traveling to the Capitol. Initially, Caesar dismisses her concerns by commenting that the omens are not personally directed towards him and famously says,

"Cowards die many times before their deaths. The valiant never taste of death but once" (2.2.32-33).

Caesar proceeds to inquire about the priests' prophecies and determines that their ominous portents are meant to test his courage. After his wife continues to beg him to stay home, Caesar acquiesces and tells Decius that he will not travel to the Capitol. Caesar then relates Calphurnia's prophetic dream and Decius puts a favorable spin on it, which assures Caesar that he has nothing to fear. Decius also informs Caesar that the senators are prepared to offer him the crown and suggests that they would criticize his masculinity if he refused to show up. Decius's manipulative tactics work and Caesar decides to travel to the Capitol against his wife's wishes. Overall, Caesar is determined to go to the Capitol because he is confident, bold, and resolute. His hubris prohibits him from acting cautiously and his vanity allows him to be easily manipulated by Decius. In addition to his hubris and arrogance, Caesar's ambition also motivates him to visit the Capitol in hopes of attaining the crown.

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