In "A New England Nun," Freeman narrates women’s assertion of control over their own domestic situations. What kinds of strategies does Louisa employ to gain her ends? How empowering is her “revolt”? Should it be characterized as a revolt? Explain.

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The story is concerned with a woman who has lived alone and grown accustomed to doing things her own way and smoothly running a domestic operation. She has also been engaged to be married to a man who was absent for years.

On the one hand, Louisa knows there are...

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The story is concerned with a woman who has lived alone and grown accustomed to doing things her own way and smoothly running a domestic operation. She has also been engaged to be married to a man who was absent for years.

On the one hand, Louisa knows there are advantages to being married and sharing some responsibilities and chores. On the other hand, she prefers a tidy, quiet home, and Joe, her fiancé, is loud and messy. In addition, Louisa is a principled person and intends to get past her reservations about home environment and honor her commitment. Joe, although he went behind her back and got involved with another woman, also plans to keep his word regarding the marriage.

Louisa goes against social convention by choosing to remain alone. This could be considered a revolt. She knows that the likelihood is that the town will assume he jilted her and she probably expects that she will not find a more suitable partner in the future. Without telling him she knows of his unfaithfulness, she breaks up with him. Because she keeps quiet about the reason, her action seems less like a revolt, which is highly public.

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