In 1984, Winston says he has no desire to lie to Julia. Why wouldn't he? How was that a success of his training?

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In the novel 1984, the government (Big Brother) enforces a society where a certain form of perfection (perfect devotion to the government and acceptance of its ideals) is necessary. To maintain this perfection, a person like Winston , who has doubts and seditious thoughts, has to lie to those...

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In the novel 1984, the government (Big Brother) enforces a society where a certain form of perfection (perfect devotion to the government and acceptance of its ideals) is necessary. To maintain this perfection, a person like Winston, who has doubts and seditious thoughts, has to lie to those around him, including his employer and his family. With Julia, however, he feels no desire to lie.

Winston and Julia maintain a secret, illicit affair while acting like model citizens. They each come to the belief that this small act of rebellion allows them to have an outlet for their seditious tendencies and actually enables them to be better servants of the government. He has no desire to lie to her because they are each other's escape from the government. Winston's training has coded him to believe that the government is actually beneficial and that a small act of rebellion with Julia will help him to act out his sedition and yet be a better citizen. It allows him to focus on one small act that he is doing to defy the government and essentially removes all of his more severe ideas of rebellion that he is inclined to.

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Winston sees the lives every person leads as some semblance of a lie. He knows how information is mangled in his own office, and he has a vague idea that the government is indeed building and rebuilding memories from scratch every day. (Freedom is the freedom to say that 2 + 2 = 4). He sees his relationship with Julie as the only true thing in the world, and therefore sacrosanct from lies.

This is a success of his training because he is so focused on this newfound freedom, he completely allows himself to believe that the government really allows free pockets. He really believes that "memory holes" make the thing go away. He lets himself be caught out completely by his willingness to believe that truth can still exist.

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