In 1984, why is the state of paranoia so important to the Party's system of control?

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Paranoia is the best way to control the masses because they are more likely to accept oppressive rules and breaches of personal freedoms if they believe they will be safer otherwise. This overwhelming fear is what causes the people to accept a totalitarian government or inspires people to spy on their own family members and friends. The Party feeds their fears and convinces them that only drastic measures will save them from enemy spies and death at the hands of invaders out to bomb their homes into rubble.

In 1984, the Party keeps the public in a constant state of paranoia through propaganda regarding enemy nations out to invade and destroy Oceania, as well as via strategic bomb droppings said to be the work of enemy soldiers, keeping the people terrified of terrorist attacks. However, Orwell leaves little hints that the other nations might not be invading and that the dreaded revolutionary Emmanuel Goldstein might not even exist. Both could be manufactures of the Party in order to create...

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