Imagine you are Big Nurse. Write a creative journal entry in which you reflect about McMurphy and your experience with him and the other patients as depicted in Ken Kesey's novel One Flew Over the...

Imagine you are Big Nurse. Write a creative journal entry in which you reflect about McMurphy and your experience with him and the other patients as depicted in Ken Kesey's novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

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kipling2448 | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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A hypothetical journal entry written by Nurse Ratched regarding the effects Randle McMurphy has had on the other patients could read something like this:

Journal Entry

As I suspected, one of our newer Admissions, Randle McMurphy, had proven a serious discipline problem.  From his first minutes here, he had been a disruptive presence, inciting the other patients and angering the other nurses and staff with his disrespectful behavior.  I recall his arrival here.  He made no secret that he thought this little escape from the work camp would be a vacation, declaring, “Yessir, that’s what I came to this establishment for, to bring you birds fun an’ entertainment around the gamin’ table. Nobody left in that Pendleton Work Farm to make my days interesting any more, so I requested a transfer, ya see."  True to his word, McMurphy has made his presence known. He wasted no time defying orders and upsetting routines, right from the start giving the staff a hard time about his shower.

The other patients have had a difficult time adapting to McMurphy's presence, as his anti-social attitudes conflict with the routines they find so comforting. One of the more disruptive moments involved McMurphy's desire to watch some baseball games, specifically, the World Series, about which the other patients could care less.  McMurphy had the temerity to believe this was a democratic process and tried desperately to get the other patients to vote with him.  Finally, Billy Bibbitt spoke up, explaining to Randle:

“Some of us have b-been here for fi-fi-five years, Randle. And some of us will b-be here maybe th-that muh-muh-much longer, long after you’re g-g-gone, long after this Wo-world Series is over. And ... don’t you see …”

McMurphy wouldn't let it go, though, and continued to incite the other patients until many of them agreed that they should be allowed to watch the World Series.  I should have viewed that episode as a warning, but I underestimated the damage one out of control patient could inflict on this institution.  McMurphy continued to manipulate the other patients until I found myself losing control of the place.  The incident with the boat and the prostitutes was beyond shameful, and corrupted the last decent men in this hospital. He worked the other patients until they agreed that they all wanted to go fishing on a boat despite my efforts at convincing them that it would be too dangerous even if they got permission to go on such a foolhardy adventure. 

What bothers me the most is the influence McMurphy has had on Billy, an innocent and deeply troubled boy who trusted that insolent bastard. The party when they trashed the hallways and rooms and then to find Billy with that whore, and all I could think of was what I would say to his parents. McMurphy has succeeded in turning the other patients against me, and now poor Billy is dead because of that miscreant's insubordination. I firmly believe my only recourse is to recommend him for a lobotomy. 

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