I'm writing an essay, about the satire Twain uses to show the stupidity and injustice in society and need a quote on Jim's caring for Huck.But I can not find a quote that would describe how Jim is...

I'm writing an essay, about the satire Twain uses to show the stupidity and injustice in society and need a quote on Jim's caring for Huck.

But I can not find a quote that would describe how Jim is a fatherly figure to Huck, and how he cares so for Huck.Just need one quote that would show how Jim is a better person than Pap, and how he cares for Huck.

Asked on by khashi

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In Chapter IX unbenowst to Huck, Jim and he find Pap's dead body in a house; Pap has been shot in the back.  Jim quickly covers the body so that Huck will not recognize his father.  Later, in the next chapter (X), Huck wants to talk about the dead man and conjecture as to why the man has been killed.  Jim refuses to discuss this murder saying it "would fetch bad luck" and the ghost might haunt them.  Huck retorts,

'Well here's your bad luck!  We've raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides.  I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim.'

With verbal irony, still protective of the knowledge of Huck's Pap being the dead man, Jim replies,

Never you mind, honey, never you mind.  Gon't you git too peart.  It's a-comin'.  Mind I tell you, it's a-comin'.'

Then,in Chapter XV as Huck and Jim travel down the river, they become separated in the fog after an adventure of boarding a wrecked steamboat and stealing some good from three thieves on board.  They are parted from one another by a cut bank that is an island and Jim who is alone on the raft has gone on either side. After "whooping out" for hours, an exhausted Huck falls asleep, and when he awakens he sees the raft. Huck sneaks onto the raft and convinces Jim that the separation was merely a dream.  When Huck point to "evidence" of the nights's adventure and teases Jim for being guillible, Jim displays his fatherly love for the boy:

'When I got all wore out wid work, en wid de callin' for you, en went to sleep, my heart wuz mos' broke bekase you waz los', en I didn' k'yer no mo' what become er me en de raf.  En when I wake up en fine you back ag'in, all safe en soun', de tears come, en I could 'a'got down on my knees en kiss' yo' foot, I's so thankful.'

Huck is humbled by this show of affection and feels ashamed of himself for playing the trick on Jim.  He says "I wouldn't done that one if I'd 'a' knowed it would make him feel that way."

 

englishteacher83's profile pic

englishteacher83 | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

Chapter XVI

“Pooty soon I’ll be a-shout’n’ for joy, en I’ll say, it’s all on accounts o’ Huck; I’s a free man, en I couldn’t’ ever ben free ef it hadn’t ben for Huck; Huck done it. Jim won’t ever forgit you, Huck; you’s de bes’ fren’ Jim’s ever had; en you’s de only fren’ Jim’s got now.”

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