I'm writing a monologue/imaginative spoken task/analysis on the representation of guilt and conscience in the play Macbeth, for the Banquo's ghost, and dagger scenes.  Please can you give me some...

I'm writing a monologue/imaginative spoken task/analysis on the representation of guilt and conscience in the play Macbeth, for the Banquo's ghost, and dagger scenes.

 

Please can you give me some quotes to help me out.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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This appears to be an interesting assignment. I can certainly point you in the right direction of the quotes that you need, but as far as the actual response you write, you are going to have to think very carefully yourself about what you do and how you do it. From the question you have been given, it seems as if you need to be creative above all, so try and think of different ways of completing this assignment rather than just writing an essay.

The dagger scene comes in Act II scene 1, and is part of one of Macbeth's soliloquies that is very important to study. The appearance of the dagger directly relates to the internal conflict going on inside of Macbeth, and the themes of guilt and conscience. Note how this soliloquy starts:

Is this a dagger, which I see before me,

The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee:--

I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.

Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible

To feeling, as to sight? or art thou but

A dagger of the mind, a false creation,

Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?

Note how conscience is refered to in the way that Macbeth seeks to interpret the dagger, which is a symbol of murder and his guilt. His conscience is clearly showing the path that lays before him.

The scene containing Banquo's ghost occurs in Act III scene 4, which is when Macbeth is the only person able to see the figure of Banquo's dead body seated at the banquet table. A good quote would be when he addresses the ghost:

Why, what care I? If thou canst nod, speak too.--

If charnel-houses and our graves must send

Those that we bury, back, our monuments

Shall be the maws of kites.

Here we see Macbeth's guilt and fear and his conscience working altogether to oppose him. Having coldly organised for Banquo's murder, he is now tormented by his ghost, which is a visible symbol of his conscience refusing to be ignored.

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