I'm writing an analysis essay on James Hogg's The Brownie of Bodsbeck. I've received feedback suggesting I connect how the nationalistic and ideological struggles coincide with the fight for gender...

I'm writing an analysis essay on James Hogg's The Brownie of Bodsbeck. I've received feedback suggesting I connect how the nationalistic and ideological struggles coincide with the fight for gender equality through Nanny. It has also been suggested that I show that Hogg’s depiction of Nanny’s nationalistic pride directly fuels her fervor for feminine agency. How can I show this? "Through his depiction of Nanny and Katherine, Hogg shows that the fight for ideological freedom and the fight for gender equality need not be mutually exclusive." What does this mean?

Expert Answers
hannahhunt09 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

From the information given in this question, it sounds as if your editor would like to see a further demonstration in your essay of the two female characters and how their struggles mirror the larger national issues in the story. The Brownie of Bodsbeck is known for Hogg's unconventional female characters, who do not conform to stereotypical female roles. Katherine's importance to the nation, despite the fact that she is unmarried and denies courtship with the "Highland hero," gives Scotland a new kind of heroine that is set apart from earlier symbolic Scottish figures. Other characters are male but are lower-class in Scottish standards, yet play a vital part in helping their country. Hogg is showing how two non-traditional types of national hero are nonetheless hugely important to their nation. Many characters deny Katharine's usefulness and are even frightened of her, but Nanny is one of the few that can see through the former "ideals" to the new revolution that is coming true in reality. The feedback from your instructor implies that he/she would like you to juxtapose these two characters and their femininity with the larger picture of Scottish politics and freedom.