In Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, help me compare and contrast the Bingley-Darcy and Jane-Elizabeth relationships.

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In both of these pairs, there is a secondary individual and a primary one. Bingley and Jane are secondary while Darcy and Elizabeth are primary. The interesting paradox (seeming contradiction between truth and what is) is that the two secondary individuals teach the two primary ones lessons and are proven...

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In both of these pairs, there is a secondary individual and a primary one. Bingley and Jane are secondary while Darcy and Elizabeth are primary. The interesting paradox (seeming contradiction between truth and what is) is that the two secondary individuals teach the two primary ones lessons and are proven correct in situations where the primaries are proven incorrect. The foundation of each of these pairs is a deep mutual bond of love, esteem, admiration and friendship.

While Bingley and Jane are, for the most part, followers of Darcy and Elizabeth, respectively, they are also the voices of reason while Darcy and Elizabeth are the voices of emotional reaction. This may seem an odd statement to make about Darcy, but his censure of Elizabeth at the Meryton ball was based entirely on feelings: he didn't feel comfortable with strangers; he didn't feel there was status in dancing with someone whose beauty was of secondary lustre; he didn't feel inclined to talk to anyone not in his own party (Bingley, Mrs. Hurst, Miss Bingley, Mr. Hurst). In contrast, Bingley and Jane represent reason throughout when they urge their friends to be more tolerant and open (Bingley-Darcy) or to be more accepting and generous (Jane-Elizabeth).

Between him and Darcy there was a very steady friendship, in spite of great opposition of character. Bingley was endeared to Darcy by the easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition could offer a greater contrast to his own,

In the end, Bingley's willingness to disregard Jane's family and connections and accept Jane for herself proves correct while Darcy's impulse to withdraw from the Bennet family and connections proves incorrect. In the end, Jane's willingness to have generous and accepting opinions of acquaintances proves correct (except as regards Wickham and the Bingley ladies who were represented as being bad beyond her previous experience), while Elizabeth's impulse for instant prideful and prejudicial likes or dislikes proves incorrect.

[Elizabeth] "Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself."

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