I'm reading The Great Gatsby and our assignment is to prepare a eulogy for Gatsby from the perspective of Owl Eyes.He only appears three times in the novel so I am struggling to come up with...

I'm reading The Great Gatsby and our assignment is to prepare a eulogy for Gatsby from the perspective of Owl Eyes.

He only appears three times in the novel so I am struggling to come up with things to talk about. Please help!

Expert Answers
mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby the character Owl Eyes is likened to the picture on the huge billboard in The Valley of Ashes, the great wasteland outside suburban New York.  Like the billboard symbol, Owl Eyes, albeit a bit comical in his drunkenness at Gatsby's party, perceives much more than the other guests or even Daisy.  For, when he enters the library of Gatsby, expecting the books to merely have the facade of leatherbound volumes, Owl Eyes discovers that they are genuine.  He, then, understands that Gatsby is also genuine, unlike the others.  At the funeral where Daisy and Tom do not appear, nor do any others that Gatsby thought friends, Owl Eyes does attend respectfully.  When Nick tells him that no one even came to the house, Owl Eyes is shocked:  "Why, ...they used to go there by the hundreds."  Taking off his glasses and wiping them as a gesture that signifies his clear perception, Owl Eyes remarks on the tragic figure of Gatsby:  "The poor son-of-a-bitch."

For a eulogy from the man whose car was once stuck at a party of Gatsby, one may wish to point to the great perceptive power of Owl Eyes, whose very name symbolizes his ability to see all sides of any incident.  It is Owl Eyes alone who has insight into the tragic character of Gatsby, a man who is genuinely in love with what he believes is the person Daisy, and who pursues the illusive American Dream, believing that his money can bring him acceptance in the East Egg world of high society.

Check the site below and read the character analysis of Gatsby for other insights into his character.

Read the study guide:
The Great Gatsby

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