I'm going to teach ( intermediate level) .. and my lesson is about the doctors & hospitals something like that.. Can you give me warm-up ideas ..?or an interesting introduction about the lesson.....

I'm going to teach ( intermediate level) .. and my lesson is about the doctors & hospitals something like that.. Can you give me warm-up ideas ..?

or an interesting introduction about the lesson.. in order to let them to discover the subject of the lesson by themselves?

Asked on by pure

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Why don't you ask kids to brainstorm everything they know about doctors and hospitals. You can activate prior knowledge this way. This can be done either as a class, or with each child doing this individually and then sharing as a group once they've done it on their own.
ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I'm really not sure what this unit is going to be about. I would assume that there is vocabulary to go along with it. Prior to starting the unit give them the vocabulary in manageable chunks. That way they go into the unit understanding the terminology. After that make sure there is time to read, reflect, and make personal connections to what they are supposed to learn, and how it's relevant in their own lives.

herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I am a firm believer in constructivism and project-based learning, so the previous activities by McKapen1 and Aknnan are awesome to activate schema.

After they have their prior knowledge in check, how about your turn your classroom into a clinic, and assign roles randomly (they can pull out their role from a bag) and those who are doctors would research on what are the responsibilities of their job, and those who are nurses, techs, etc, would also be able to research the duties that they are expected to perform.

Awesome ideas!

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In my opinion, I think there needs to be more information about the lesson here.  In teaching any new lesson to students, I find it helpful to work backwards.  This means identifying what concepts do I want the students to know at the conclusion of the lesson.  I would start here first.  Identify about three or four essential points that you think that your students must absolutely have at the end of the unit and begin your introduction to the unit with these in mind.  This will help allow students to develop a frame of reference with which to approach your teaching and can provide some structure to the lesson.  Once you have identified these goals of the lesson, you can determine how you want the warm- up ideas to commence in terms of how these ideas will possess the key points within them.  Articulating these concepts will help set up how you are going to introduce, instruct, and reinforce these concepts throughout the unit.

mkcapen1's profile pic

mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

If you are teaching about the occupations of doctors and hospitals and/or services, then you could use a grab bag.  Put the students in groups of fours.  In each bag put some items. 

  1. A safety pin, a bandage, a band-aid, and cotton ball. 
  2. A box of tissues or a couple of tissues, a small container of hand sanitizer, and a pair of gloves.
  3. A red cross, a hospital sign made on a small scrap of paper and a picture of a wheel chair printed off of the internet.
  4. A toy doll male or female, a Popsicle stick, and a broken pencil (both pieces).

Give each group an index card.  Have the students look at their objects away from one another.  Next have them write down whatever ideas they have as a group that could relate to the objects they have in their bag.  Have them return to their seats.

On the board have students list their answers.  If time does not allow have them call out the answers to put on the board.  This can be used to open the discussion.

 

 

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