I'm doing a discussion on Mary Wollstonecraft, and i was just curious as to know what was her main view point on governments?

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Mary Wollstonecraft embodies the philosophical meme of the 18th century, where common sense and the individual rights of all men were propelled to the highest position of importance in society. She is a wonderful representative of the women of her time: Those who set their thoughts and opinions completely separate from the mainstream ideals imposed by society upon its citizens.

Wollstonecraft is a valuable member of the distinct circle of philosophers that set their views during a time where the views of Thomas Paine and Rousseau among many others. In her case, however, she made it clear to her peers that her voice would be heard. Her work not only consists on essays, but also on rebuttals made to prominent thinkers of her time.

Her views on government were perhaps what really identified her as a fighter and a strong woman. First, she disagreed with the ideas that were coming up at the time stating that men and women needed different types of education. In her world, Mary felt that all women should be equally educated as men. She also questioned the Christian-based believe that a marriage is a way to make a communion with God since a woman needs a man for spiritual and physical balance. A true believer in equality, Wollstonecraft argued this point many times reminding people that God created everyone equally, and that men should not have any precedence over women.

She believed in egalitarian treatment for everyone, so naturally she was completely opposed to the monarchy and the idea of one class ruling over another. Moreover, she also advocated in favor of equal opportunities for men and women in governmental and social legislation.

In all, you could say that Wollstonecraft was a bonafide believer in socialism, particularly in the area of common treatment for men and women. It is understandable, since Mary was such a remarkable speaker, thinker, and writer.

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