Im doing an essay on H1N1, and im having trouble thinking of a thesis statement..My research paper is going to seperate fact from fiction. Some people say that the H1N1 empidimic was just a money...

Im doing an essay on H1N1, and im having trouble thinking of a thesis statement..

My research paper is going to seperate fact from fiction. Some people say that the H1N1 empidimic was just a money grab for the government, while others believe its a global issue.

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Much of the construction in any thesis statement is contingent on the evidence collected and what can be proven.  I would submit that a quality thesis statement would be to discuss how the process of misinformation has impacted the perception of the H1N1 virus.  I would also suggest another thesis statement being on the how individual agenda has emerged throughout the H1N1 debate.  Your thesis statement would be best served in assembling all of your evidence and clearly identifying what it is you are going to prove throughout your paper.  Your thesis statement becomes an extension of this.  You have a good topic area, so being able to analyze what evidence you have collected might be a very good start to constructing a thesis statement.

mkcapen1 | Student

Before beginning any thesis one needs to develop an idea of what they can and can not support.  For example: Can you find facts to support the statement that the H1N1 virus is a money grub issue for the government?  I think that will be hard to do and is more of a speculation.

You could easily be able to find information relative to the spread of the H1N1 virus that will either support or dispute a claim that the virus is a global issue.  I believe this would be the better route to go.

The next thing you have to do is make a statement that you can prove, and list the facts and sites that help you to prove it.  No thesis statement should exist without evidence tot support it.