If the main conflict is man versus himself in "Charles" by Shirley Jackson, what is the climax?

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What's interesting about the reveal in the climax of Shirley Jackson's "Charles" (1948) is that it's satisfying even though the reader can see it coming from a mile off. We derive a grim sort of satisfaction from the climax because even though we as readers know the secret of the story, the two parents at the heart of it are deliberately clueless. Their suspension of disbelief is of the willing kind—sort of like a wishing-away of reality by shutting their eyes.

The story's central conceit is that, as their kindergarten-age son Laurie brings home outrageous stories of an ill-behaved classmate named Charles, they witness his own behavior worsen. Charles "hits the teacher" while Laurie "laughs insanely" and calls his father dumb while playing a trick on him. The mother worries Charles is a bad influence on Laurie, even as Laurie greets his father with: "Hi, Pop, y'old dust mop."

When Laurie comes home late one day, he tells his parents that this is because his entire class has been made to...

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