Identify the CSR model you employ and answer the following question: what responsibilities does Facebook, Google, or Twitter have for policing political advertisement placed on their platform?

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Because political outcomes have such a wide variety of social implications, one can use all four traditional models of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to evaluate this question.

The most straightforward model here may be Philanthropic Responsibility. Under this CSR model, a corporation's commitment to serving humanity precludes it from...

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Because political outcomes have such a wide variety of social implications, one can use all four traditional models of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) to evaluate this question.

The most straightforward model here may be Philanthropic Responsibility. Under this CSR model, a corporation's commitment to serving humanity precludes it from obstructing free democracy. If a site fails to successfully handle political propaganda or misinformation, this could be seen as a failure to meet that crucial responsibility. This could lead to a tainted election, the consequences of which could even further violate the company's philanthropic promise.

A social media company's Economic Responsibility dictates that they perform the commercial functions of their business in a manner that promotes their broader social ethos. This, too, is highly relevant to the issue—under the economic model of CSR, a company's ad policies and practices should be codified and enforced to ensure they meet that standard.

Though corporate entities themselves have an Environmental Responsibility to ensure their own practices are informed by climate science, the consequences here go even further. Climate action (or inaction) is often a direct function of political regulation, which is driven primarily by elected officials. If a social media company participates in the unfair election of a politician who works against this process, the company has abdicated that social responsibility.

Social media companies also have an Ethical Responsibility to operate in a manner that gives consideration to the well-being of their employees, users, and other stakeholders. If the company's policies are negatively impacting free and fair elections, that puts the individuals directly involved in an extremely difficult position: they must potentially lose a hard-won career or knowingly participate in an entity that threatens democracy. For the users—who constitute an enormous population—this risk extends even further. A user might be individually manipulated, or the world around them might be manipulated in a way that makes them less safe.

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