Identify one or more characters in the novel The Time Machine and examine their biases. How do the following factors affect the characters' biases? Gender, socioeconomic status, religion, influences of family and friends, prior knowledge, personal experience.

Class struggle and socioeconomic bias is at the center of the novel in the Eloi and Morlocks. The Time Traveller's guests also have their share of biases toward the world and the Time Traveller's experiences. The Time Traveller himself is biased with regard to humanity and toward Weena.

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Let's talk about the biases revealed in H. G. Wells's novel The Time Machine. We should first focus on class bias, for this stands at the heart of the novel.

When the Time Traveller goes into the future, he discovers two groups of humanlike creatures, the Eloi and...

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Let's talk about the biases revealed in H. G. Wells's novel The Time Machine. We should first focus on class bias, for this stands at the heart of the novel.

When the Time Traveller goes into the future, he discovers two groups of humanlike creatures, the Eloi and the Morlocks. The Eloi live above ground where they spend their days playing. They seem to have an ideal society, but that ideal is only on the surface, for they are terrorized by the Morlocks, a powerful group of underground creatures who are cannibals.

These two groups symbolize the class system taken to extremes. The Eloi, while materially poor, are happy—or at least, they would be if they were not the prey of the Morlocks. The Morlocks are supposedly descended from the working classes of the past, but they have turned the class system on its head.

The Time Traveller's guests have their own share of biases. The Provincial Mayor, for instance, knows next to nothing about science and tends to be biased against it. The Psychologist focuses on his interest on the past as he hears about the Time Traveller's machine, yet he doesn't really believe the Time Traveller's story. The Medical Man is also skeptical, thinking that the Time Traveller has tricked his guests. Filby is a rationalist who does not believe the Time Traveller (nor much of anything else). Hillyer believes the Time Traveller, and he is pretty much the only one. He holds onto hope even though humanity, according to the Time Traveller's stories, seems doomed. Indeed, most of the Time Traveller's guests are so trapped by their own biases that they cannot expand their minds to even consider the truth of the Time Traveller's experiences.

Finally, let's look at the Time Traveller himself. He tends to be quite pessimistic about human beings, and his journeys only make him more so. He clearly carries a bias that puts science and scientific speculation first. He also tends to be rather biased with regard to the Eloi, especially Weena, who becomes his guide. He treats her more like a little child or a pet than a true friend and companion, and he doesn't seem to care all that much about her when she dies. Indeed, the Time Traveller's focus is not necessarily on people as people but on what he can discover about the future through them.

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