Identify and explain three elements of science in sociological research.

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Your question is bit vague, but I think you are asking how science figures into sociological research. If you are asking about this, then this is a great question. Sociologist and historians of science have been studying science for a generation now from many new perspectives. They have come to...

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Your question is bit vague, but I think you are asking how science figures into sociological research. If you are asking about this, then this is a great question. Sociologist and historians of science have been studying science for a generation now from many new perspectives. They have come to many incredible conclusions. For example, Thomas Kuhn has shown that science is not as objective as it claims to be. Kuhn argues that since there are many paradigm sifts in scientific communities, science is subjective in many ways. Also Stanley Tambiah shows that science and religion were not separated in the past. In fact, he shows that religion actually helped to develop science. Other scholars look at various topics of science from a sociological point of view with great benefit.

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This question isn't very clear, but I'll do my best to answer what I think you are asking.

I think you're asking how sociological research is similar to scientific research.  Here are three ways:

  1. Both are supposed to use the scientific method.  A researcher is supposed to form a hypothesis, choose a research design and then collect and analyze data to prove or disprove the hypothesis.
  2. Sociologists sometimes use statistical analysis.  They will use things like regressions to try to determine how much of an effect various variables have on something.
  3. They often try to use control groups to determine whether the variable they are studying truly has any effect on their dependent variable.
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