Identify each of the conflicting forces and explain how this conflict within the character shows the meaning of Frankenstein.This is my essay prompt and I have to choose a character whose mind is...

Identify each of the conflicting forces and explain how this conflict within the character shows the meaning of Frankenstein.

This is my essay prompt and I have to choose a character whose mind is pulled in conflicting directions and explain what the inner struggle is and how it contributes to the novel. I don't know where I should start and which character has the most textual evidence to support it. Please help me. Thank you in advanced

Expert Answers
lynnebh eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I think two characters have the most inner struggles - Walton, the ship captain who is on a voyage of discovery that endangers his men, and of course Frankenstein. Frankenstein, however, has the most inner struggle and this struggle contributes to the theme of the novel.

Frankenstein's mind and conscience are pulled in two separate directions after the monster comes to life. He continually struggles with whether he should  kill the monster or not. He is guilty because HE is the one that created the monster. He also struggles greatly over whether or not to create a mate for the monster. On one hand, if he does so, the monster says that he will leave Frankenstein alone. Frankenstein does not believe, this, however, and he finally comes to the conclusion that if he creates a mate, it would do more harm than good, because then there would be two monsters, not just one. He does not trust the monster to keep his word.

This is one of the major themes of the  novel - duty and responsibility. What should be the greater responsibility? Should Frankenstein's responsibility be to the monster HE has created, or to his fellow man, to whom the monster is a daanger? Since Frankestein has acquired forbidden knowledge, knowledge that should be in God's realm, not man's (creation), is he obligated to not repeat his great sin of trying to be like God?

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Frankenstein

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