Identify an individual in act 2 who uses propaganda to advance their own pursuits.

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If propaganda is defined as information that is biased or misleading used to advance a cause, then Mary Warren is guilty of propagandizing when she tells the Proctors that Sarah Good sent her spirit out in the courtroom and "near to choked us all to death." Spectral evidence was accepted...

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If propaganda is defined as information that is biased or misleading used to advance a cause, then Mary Warren is guilty of propagandizing when she tells the Proctors that Sarah Good sent her spirit out in the courtroom and "near to choked us all to death." Spectral evidence was accepted in the Salem court and required no hard, tangible proof of supernatural wrongdoing. Mary and the other girls who are so-called officials of the court are savvy enough to know that their misleading testimony about Sarah Good advances and solidifies their allegations of witchcraft.

John Proctor indulges in a bit of propaganda to try to preserve his reputation when he tells Hale that Abigail Williams said that what the girls were doing in the woods was "sport." When Hale asks Proctor why he kept that information under wraps, Proctor attempts to mislead Hale by saying " I never knew until tonight that the world is gone daft with this nonsense." The truth is John Proctor does not want Hale to know that there is any degree of intimacy between Abigail and himself.

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Propaganda, of its very nature, involves manipulating information to serve someone's ends. In The Crucible the whole witch-craze is based on this foundation. In Act II Abigail Williams is so hell-bent on destroying Elizabeth Proctor that she's prepared to present a harmless little doll as an instrument of diabolical witchcraft. Abby knows full well that Elizabeth's completely innocent of any crime, but she's already reached the stage where just one word from those lying lips of hers is enough to get someone into serious trouble. Abby loves the feeling of power that the witch-craze gives her and she's not about to let it go anytime soon. With power comes propaganda. Throughout history it has been used by authorities to maintain power and control over others, and that's how Abby uses it here.

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Abigail Williams uses propaganda in order to advance her own agenda by accusing Elizabeth Proctor of engaging in witchcraft. In act 2, court officials visit John Proctor's home to search for a poppet. Apparently, Abigail Williams witnessed Mary Warren making the poppet in court earlier that day and watched her place the needle into the doll's stomach. Knowing that Mary Warren would return to John Proctor's home, Abigail Williams stabs herself with a needle and blames Elizabeth Proctor for attempting to murder her. When the court officials find the poppet with the needle stuck into it in Proctor's home, they automatically assume that Elizabeth used the poppet as some sort of voodoo doll to harm Abigail Williams. Abigail's propaganda successfully convinces the court officials that Elizabeth Proctor is involved in witchcraft, and they eventually arrest her. Overall, Abigail Williams uses propaganda to advance her agenda in act 2, which results in the arrest of Elizabeth Proctor.

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I had to edit down the original question.  I think that more of it could be posted in an additional question, though.  It seems to me that a working definition of propaganda might be in order: "the spreading of ideas, information, or rumor for the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person."  Certainly, this definition would apply to Abigail.  Her histrionics at dinner that evening and the idea that since Elizabeth owns a poppet, given to her by Mary, she must be responsible for Abigail's supposed pain is an example of propaganda.  It is propaganda because it is rooted in the spreading of a rumor in the hopes of making Elizabeth to seem as a witch, causing her both a lack of reputation and her imprisonment along with eventual death so that she can get John Proctor to herself.  In Act II, Abigail has mastered the ability to peddle her propaganda to discredit those who she perceives as an enemy.  For Abigail, the injury to people like Elizabeth is the most important end.  Her use of propaganda in the form of rumor and insinuation to accomplish this is evident in Act II, scene 4.

 

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