I have to do a dramatic monologue in the role of the billboard of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg in the Valley of Ashes. What tone of voice would it have? What would it see? What opinions would it have on the characters in the book?

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Wow!  This is a good idea.  One of the first things that pops into my mind is that billboard.  You really need to give the billboard a personality.  The best way to do that is to describe what it sees in the way it might feel when it sees it. ...

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Wow!  This is a good idea.  One of the first things that pops into my mind is that billboard.  You really need to give the billboard a personality.  The best way to do that is to describe what it sees in the way it might feel when it sees it.  The billboard really witnesses a lot, doesn’t it?

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Distant and judgemental would be phrases I'd use to characterize a potential tone of voice for Dr. Eckleburg. 

He is vigilant and constant and he is unmoved by the petty antics and the even more petty rationalizations of the people speeding beneath his gaze. He has a permanence that mocks the fleeting appetites of people like Gatsby, Tom and Daisy.

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I would think the tone of Dr T.J Eckleburg  would be gloomy, dark, and judgemental. He is surrounded by the ashes of modern living and modern lives. He is the all-seeing eye, albeit a sort of ridiculous one to have so much power (which is part of Fitzgerald's point in the metaphor: the holder of omniscient power is a bit ridiculous and impotent).

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Since Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is a satire on the American Dream, a dream that is sullied by the materialistic and amoral conduct of the flappers, gangsters, and jaded wealthy of the time, Dr. T. J. Eckleburg would observe those people traversing the Valley of Ashes as they go to New York City or to Long Island where the great parties are held in the summer.Therefore, the tone of the voice of Dr. Eclkeburg should be cynical and satiric since he sits above the industrial waste of a careless generation that provides no sympathy for the melancholic Wilson, and cruelly runs over a woman without stopping. 

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The billboard featuring the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg is associated with the ideas of judgement and God.

Personified, the eyes are impersonal but not impartial. They function as the suggestion that there is a moral code and a moral order in the world. This moral order may be disembodied, but that does not mean it does not exist. 

This suggestion is made by George Wilson toward the end of the novel when he connects the eyes on the billboard to the eyes of God. 

Keeping these ideas in mind, we might expect a voice for this figurative character to be expansive, distant, absolute, and perhaps more than a little sad. Not much that passes beneath the eyes in the novel can be described as good, wholesome or motivated by goodness. 

...the watchful eyes of Dr. Eckleburg keep vigil over the sad happenings of the valley of ashes.

The eyes see Myrtle killed. They see Tom come to pick up Myrtle and take her to New York. They see Tom generally abuse his position of wealth and power. They see people on the way to carouse and cavort in New York City, spending time and money like it will never run out. 

There is a short-sightedness to the activities seen by the eyes. The lessons learned in the story are learned elsewhere for the most part, in the privacy of Nick's reflections. 

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