I am trying to analyze the quote from Macbeth: "Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all, / As the weird women promised, and, I fear, / Thou play'dst most foully for't..." I am struggling to find particular words to analyze that link to betrayal or ambition. 

This quote from Macbeth reveals Banquo's growing suspicion that Macbeth participated in King Duncan's murder. The particular words "thou has it now" and "played’st most foully" are associated with the concepts of betrayal and ambition. The words "thou has it now" refer to Macbeth's title as king of Scotland, which was the position he desired that awakened his ambition. Betrayal is demonstrated by Macbeth's foul play to attain the throne, which refers to his crime of assassinating King Duncan.

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The last line of Banquo's quote directly relates to the concepts of betrayal and ambition when he states, "And I fear thou played’st most foully for ’t." Banquo was present when Macbeth received the initial prophecies from the Three Witches, which awakened Macbeth 's ambition and motivated him to...

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The last line of Banquo's quote directly relates to the concepts of betrayal and ambition when he states, "And I fear thou played’st most foully for ’t." Banquo was present when Macbeth received the initial prophecies from the Three Witches, which awakened Macbeth's ambition and motivated him to betray King Duncan by committing regicide. In act 1, scene 3, Macbeth and Banquo interacted with the witches, who addressed Macbeth as Thane of Glamis, Thane of Cawdor, and future king of Scotland. Shortly after receiving the prophecies, Ross and Angus informed Macbeth that he had been named Thane of Cawdor, which confirmed one of the prophecies and influenced Macbeth to contemplate assassinating the king. From the moment that the first prophecy was confirmed, Macbeth began entertaining thoughts of murdering the king to usurp the throne.

The first sentence of Banquo's quote in act 3, scene 1, relates to the witches' prophecies and Macbeth's desires, while the second sentence reveals his growing suspicions regarding Macbeth's involvement in Duncan's murder. Specifically, the words "thou has it now" and "played’st most foully" are closely associated with the concepts of betrayal and ambition. The words "thou has it now" refer to Macbeth's prestigious titles, particularly that of king of Scotland, which was the position he desired that stimulated his ambition.

Banquo is also saying that he believes Macbeth engaged in foul play to attain his position as king. The foul play refers to Macbeth's betrayal of King Duncan. The audience also recognizes that Macbeth's primary motivating factor for committing regicide is his ambition, which was aroused when the first prophecy regarding his new title Thane of Cawdor was confirmed by Duncan's messengers.

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In tragedies, the heroes, who are people of status and admirable character, are often brought down by something Aristotle called a hamartia, a mistake which ultimately causes their downfall and destroys their character. For example, in the play Othello, the brave hero's character flaw is a jealous nature, and it drives him to kill his wife, which ultimately brings about his being dishonored and dying by his own hand. In Macbeth, Macbeth's character flaw is greed, and it drives him to murder King Duncan. In the quote your question is referencing, Banquo is reflecting upon how Macbeth's greed has likely led to him to murder the king.

He says, "Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all." Banquo was present with Macbeth when the three weird sisters, or witches, gave Macbeth the prophecy that he would be Thane of Cawdor and king. Banquo not only saw the strange witches, he also saw the effect their words had on Macbeth. The first prophecy, that Macbeth would be Thane of Cawdor, came about soon after the witches disappeared. The fulfillment of that prophecy grew like a seed of poison in Macbeth; after he had a taste of favorable destiny coming true, his mind opened to the potential that he could be king. He begins to covet that position of power and ultimately takes fate into his own hands. He tries to help fate along, and he ends up losing his good name, his integrity, and all his titles because he cheats. That is the paradox of fate in many Shakespearean tragedies: "Fair is foul, and foul is fair." The fair prize of being king is so desirable that it leads to foul play and a foul ending for Macbeth.

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Banquo's quote takes place at the beginning of act three, scene one, following King Duncan's assassination and Macbeth's ascension to the throne. Banquo is commenting on the fact that each of Macbeth's prophecies has come to fruition. It was prophesied that Macbeth would become the Thane of Cawdor and the future king, which is exactly what happened. However, Banquo also comments, "And I fear thou played’st most foully for ’t" (Shakespeare, 3.1.2). The last line of Banquo's quote reveals his suspicions that Macbeth played a role in King Duncan's assassination. Banquo essentially believes that Macbeth betrayed King Duncan and was responsible for murdering him in order to attain the Scottish throne. At this point in the play, the audience is already aware that Macbeth's "vaulting ambition" was his motivation for committing regicide. Therefore, Macbeth's ambition influenced him to betray King Duncan, which is something Banquo has evidently considered. Unfortunately for Banquo, Macbeth views him as a threat to his legacy and hires murderers to kill him and Fleance.

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In terms of ambition leading to betrayal, the last line is the most relevant part. Saying that Macbeth played foully for all the titles he has at this point in the story is emphasizing that he has been competing (playing) but with some sort of unfair (foul) advantage. The last line also emphasizes that Macbeth is so focused on winning this "game" that he will betray anyone or anything that would try to impede him from achieving his ambitions. You could definitely look at the words "I fear," also, since those are relevant to the idea of betrayal that has already occurred as well as betrayal that is yet to come in the narrative.

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