I am trying to analyze the quote from Macbeth: "Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,  / As the weird women promised, and, I fear, / Thou play'dst most foully for't . . ." I am struggling to find particular words to analyze that link to betrayal or ambition. 

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In tragedies, the heroes, who are people of status and admirable character, are often brought down by something Aristotle called a hamartia, a mistake which ultimately causes their downfall and destroys their character. For example, in the play Othello, the brave hero's character flaw is a jealous nature, and it drives him to kill his wife, which ultimately brings about his being dishonored and dying by his own hand. In Macbeth, Macbeth's character flaw is greed, and it drives him to murder King Duncan. In the quote your question is referencing, Banquo is reflecting upon how Macbeth's greed has likely led to him to murder the king.

He says, "Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all." Banquo was present with Macbeth when the three weird sisters, or witches, gave Macbeth the prophecy that he would be Thane of Cawdor and king. Banquo not only saw the strange witches, he also saw the effect their words had on Macbeth. The first prophecy, that Macbeth would be Thane of Cawdor, came about soon...

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