Hydrogen sulfide can be used in aqueous solutions to separate out metal ions. On the other hand, hydrogen sulfide in the air can cause considerable damage to silver objects. When a silver goblet tarnished in the presence of hydrogen sulfide (and oxygen), 1.20 mol of silver sulfide formed. What amount of silver was consumed? A. 4.80 mol  B. 2.40 mol C 1.20 mol D 0.600 mol

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When the silver goblet was exposed to hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, 1.2 mol of silver sulfide formed. Silver sulfide tarnish appears black.

This means 1.2 x Avogadro's number molecules of silver sulfide formed. The formula for silver sulfide is Ag[2]S. The chemical formula of silver sulfide is Ag[2]S. Every molecule...

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When the silver goblet was exposed to hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, 1.2 mol of silver sulfide formed. Silver sulfide tarnish appears black.

This means 1.2 x Avogadro's number molecules of silver sulfide formed. The formula for silver sulfide is Ag[2]S. The chemical formula of silver sulfide is Ag[2]S. Every molecule of silver sulfide contains two silver atoms. So we must multiply the number of silver sulfide molecules by 2 to calculate the amount of silver consumed in the tarnishing reaction.

1.2 mol x 2 = 2.4 mol of silver was consumed in the following tarnishing reaction:

2 Ag(s) + H[2]S(g) ---> Ag[2]S(s) + H[2](g)

where (s) indicates the solid phase and (g) indicates the gas phase.

Tarnish can be removed physically, by scrubbing it off, or chemically by reacting with aluminum. 

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