Huxley’s vision of the worldExplain why Huxley’s vision of the world could or could not come to be. What in the development of technology, especially related to education, information systems,...

Huxley’s vision of the world

Explain why Huxley’s vision of the world could or could not come to be. What in the development of technology, especially related to education, information systems, has affected and will affect and influence these developments?

Asked on by gj2003

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The most cogent points that Huxley has made are in his Foreword to Brave New World in which he discusses the advancement of technology which supercedes the progression of humanity, the power of a centralized government that has increased control over people through propaganda and the omission of the truth. Above all this, the indoctrination of people to the point that they love their servitude to the state. This, Huxley calls, the "deep, personal revolution in human minds and bodies."  With the exception of a few such as Bernard Marx and Helmholtz, this greatest of revolutions has been accomplished in the New World of Huxley's dystopia. And, frighteningly, there is indeed in modern society increasing government control, propaganda, and silence about the truth, not to mention a populace that is content with their "nanny" government and believes what is told them.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Honestly, I hope it does not happen any time soon! The book gives me the creeps. We still have some of the fabric of our society left, however quickly it seems to be unraveling. That being said, the point of a dystopia is for us to take a hard look at the world we do live in, and at ourselves. How can we live the best life possible in our world?
pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I don't think Huxley's vision could come to be any time in the foreseeable future simply because I do not believe that the technology he envisions would ever be feasible.  I do not think that an artificial incubating system with carefully calibrated steps taken to differentiate between castes is anything that is in the realm of possibility.

That said, I really don't think that's the point.  I don't think Huxley is trying to tell us that this exact future is going to come about.  Instead, he is warning us about the direction that materialism and the desire for stability could take us.  If you look at it like this, his future is much more feasible.  It is much more plausible to say that we would allow technologies of various sorts to make our lives more comfortable and predictable at the expense of some of our humanity.  This is something that has more to do with human nature than with technology.

ivana's profile pic

ivana | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted on

I do think it is possible that some day we will live in society resembling The Brave New World. If we look at just one example and that is the advertisement business, we see how much the development of technology, science and psychology is being used to manipulate people. That's just one example and there are larger influences  and powers in the world today that we don't even know of. Concerning the education, we should not believe that education is free from influence of different interest groups. Finally, higher education is available to a very small amount of people. We too live in a world divided into different groups.

 

gj2003's profile pic

gj2003 | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I don't think Huxley's vision could come to be any time in the foreseeable future simply because I do not believe that the technology he envisions would ever be feasible.  I do not think that an artificial incubating system with carefully calibrated steps taken to differentiate between castes is anything that is in the realm of possibility.

That said, I really don't think that's the point.  I don't think Huxley is trying to tell us that this exact future is going to come about.  Instead, he is warning us about the direction that materialism and the desire for stability could take us.  If you look at it like this, his future is much more feasible.  It is much more plausible to say that we would allow technologies of various sorts to make our lives more comfortable and predictable at the expense of some of our humanity.  This is something that has more to do with human nature than with technology.

Based on your experience as an educator, study and understanding of technology and its development and deployment,What in the development of technology, especially related to education had been affected and will be affected ?

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