Human rights.I want to make a presentation and speak french and english sensibilities and ideas on the theme of "Human rights" Please suggest some subtitles under which I can base my presntation on.

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wannam's profile pic

wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

I would not go so far as to say that France is less open minded than the US, but they are certainly of a different mind.  There are some things the US is uptight about that are not thought twice of in France (and vice versa, of course).  Here in the US we have a major uproar about the mother's right to breast feed her child in public.  I haven't heard of a similar uproar in France.  Europe in general tends to be a little less uptight about issues of nudity.  As mentioned, France is more strict with some of the civil liberties that we in the US take for granted.

rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

You could do a presentation on the historical origins of the UN Declaration of Human Rights, which established, in soaring but rather vague terms, what rights should be protected everywhere. The origins can be traced to Wilson's Fourteen Points as well as the Atlantic Charter jointly issued by Churchill and FDR (despite the fact that neither man's country had a particularly stellar record on human rights at the time).

lorrainecaplan's profile pic

Lorraine Caplan | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The recent killings in France and the government's response, which is to criminalize the use of particular websites would make an excellent topic for your presentation.  The French response is really to criminalize a human right, whereas it is highly unlikely that the American response would be the same.

As you consider how to organize your presentation under subheadings, you might want to organize it according to the various recent events that appear in the news, with each an entrée into the topic of various human rights and the respective countries' attitudes and handling of these. 

 

shake99's profile pic

shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Think about how the suppression of human rights can lead to situations in which we often find ourselves embroiled in conflicts, either politically or militarily: North Korea, Iran, Iraq, etc.

When was the last time we were at war with an open society? I'm not saying it can't happen, it just isn't the case most of the time.

On the other side of the coin, how often do we use alleged human rights violations as an excuse to meddle in another country's affairs?

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You might want to look at English attitudes on human rights as well.  The English have passed laws that limit to some degree the kinds of things that (for example) Muslim preachers can say.  At the same time, however, they have been unwilling to extradite people to countries that they believe will torture those people.  So there is a complex view towards human rights there.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Americans take an extreme view of human rights.  We allow poeople much more latitude in what they say and do, and respect religious freedom much more than some other countries.  Famous examples include our allowing the Neo-Nazis to parade, and the Occupy Wall Street movement.  We also are arguing about religious freedom now on the question of whether Catholic companies should be required to offer birth control and abortions in their health plans.  One opponent suggested that it would be the first nail in the coffin of religious freedom.  France, clearly, is not so open-minded.

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Judging by the French ban on the burqa, there seems to be a difference in view points between France and the US regarding notions of enforcable restrictions on individual rights. This is not necessarily a human rights issue, but can be seen as a civic or civil rights issue. 

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