Will human life spans continue to get longer? Is human life will be long in the future or not? Why !!?  

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Will human life spans continue to get longer?

Is human life will be long in the future or not?
 Why !!?

 

Yes, I think the life span will continue to get longer. The average span has increased over the years. The average now for a Caucasian male is 76 years. One could argue that advances in medical science are a major factor.

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Some people live to over 100 now and remain healthy, while others break down as they approach the seventies and eighties.  I was shocked to learn that there is a 150 year old person!  Dr. Aubrey De Grey believes that people will eventually live to 1,000.

The British scientist sees a time when people will go to their doctors for regular 'maintenance', which by then will include gene therapies, stem cell therapies, immune stimulation and a range of other advanced medical techniques to keep them in good shape. (Daily Mail)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2011425/The-person-reach-150-alive--soon-live-THOUSAND-claims-scientist.html#ixzz1uDChjQSo

It strikes me as a use for the rich alone.  Most people probably will not be able to afford this.  Will humans live to 1000?  Maybe.  Should they live to 1000?  How would that change our culture?  Those are the questions I wonder about.

Citation:

Reporter, Daily Mail. "Dawn of a New Age: The First Person to Reach 150 Is Already Alive... and Soon We'll Live to Be a THOUSAND, Claims Scientist." Mail Online. Daily Mail, 06 July 2011. Web. 07 May 2012. <http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2011425/The-person-reach-150-alive--soon-live-THOUSAND-claims-scientist.html>.

The article you cite does not say that there is a 150 year old person. It says that someone who is already alive will be the first person to reach 150, which is just speculation. The oldest living human currently is either 114 or 121, depending on which source you believe (the 114 year old is well documented, the 121 year old's birth records are not official).

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It is very likely that human life spans will continue to grow longer.  As medical science moves forward, we find news ways to treat, cure, prevent, and protect the population.  Unless there is some global catastrophe which damages our ability to continue with medical science as we are now, life spans will continue to increase.  More and more diseases will be cured or at least treatable.  Newer and better ways to live with incurable issues will surface.  We are already seeing medical trials for things like artificial limbs, cloned organs, and cures for diseases once thought incurable. 

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Some people live to over 100 now and remain healthy, while others break down as they approach the seventies and eighties.  I was shocked to learn that there is a 150 year old person!  Dr. Aubrey De Grey believes that people will eventually live to 1,000.

The British scientist sees a time when people will go to their doctors for regular 'maintenance', which by then will include gene therapies, stem cell therapies, immune stimulation and a range of other advanced medical techniques to keep them in good shape. (Daily Mail)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2011425/The-person-reach-150-alive--soon-live-THOUSAND-claims-scientist.html#ixzz1uDChjQSo

It strikes me as a use for the rich alone.  Most people probably will not be able to afford this.  Will humans live to 1000?  Maybe.  Should they live to 1000?  How would that change our culture?  Those are the questions I wonder about.

Citation:

Reporter, Daily Mail. "Dawn of a New Age: The First Person to Reach 150 Is Already Alive... and Soon We'll Live to Be a THOUSAND, Claims Scientist." Mail Online. Daily Mail, 06 July 2011. Web. 07 May 2012. <http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2011425/The-person-reach-150-alive--soon-live-THOUSAND-claims-scientist.html>.

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Although human life spans have been increasing, there is probably a natural endpoint to that process. The telomeres on the ends of our chromosomes shorten whenever a cell divides, and at some point they become too short and the cell stops dividing, meaning that renewal and healing slow down as we age. Some researchers have worked on developing ways to slow or stop the telomere shortening, but doing so in a human will likely increase the odds of that person developing cancer. So unless and until we beat cancer, we will probably not be able to use telomere therapy to extend life beyond its naturally ordained boundaries.

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I have to agree with the above posts. Statistically, humans have steadily lived longer for centuries. Adult life expectancy in America was between 70-71 years in 1960, and the upward trend has reached 78+ years by 2009. (Canada and Japan are even higher.) Compared with the 16th century, when high expectancy rates barely reached 50 years, it is easy to see that things like advanced medical services and proper diets will continue to push the trend even higher.

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I think statistical trend over history and ongoing trends in medical science suggest yes. Clearly each individual is different but I think the overall lifespan is likely to increase, barring some unforseen world wide catastrophic event that would greatly decrease the popluation and destroy the technology that allows us to live longer. However to me that sounds more like the plot of a bunch of movies I've seen than a likely reality.

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It stands to reason with medical advances that human lifespans will continue to get longer, though there may be environmental pressures like pollution that push against that trend by contributing to cancer and other diseases. It is also the case that more sedentary lifestyles may lead to more diseases. Overall, though, it seems to me that the average healthy person will be able to expect to live longer in the future. 

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Our life span has been gradually getting longer.  I think that it will continue to do so.  We continue to develop better medical technologies and to know more about health.  The one thing that could reverse this, at least in the US, is the fact that we tend to be obese.

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I think it is only logical to assume that, barring some unforeseen tragedy, humans will live longer in the future than they do today.  Every year new technologies and medical advancements are made that make treating and curing diseases easier, thus resulting in a longer lifespan.  There is no guarantee that problems won't strike an individual, but on the whole I see no reason why humans can't expect to live longer in the future.

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