How would you write a directional statement about Scout's attitude towards Boo?I am also considering a thesis about Scout growing in maturity from the beginning to end with reference to Boo. I want...

How would you write a directional statement about Scout's attitude towards Boo?

I am also considering a thesis about Scout growing in maturity from the beginning to end with reference to Boo. I want to explore her changing attitude.

Asked on by saud2121

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Your question had a couple of typos, so I am trying to understand where you want to go with this. I am making a best guess.

Every thesis should take a stand or position. You seem to want to write about how Scout's attitude toward Boo over time demonstrates a growing maturity in her.

I think this is a statement already written with direction or position if you ensure that you frame it from an optimistic or positive viewpoint. For example, "In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout's experience with Boo Radley moves from a childhood fear to adult understanding of people and their circumstances."

You can use some of Atticus' words throughout the book about learning to stand in someone else shoes. In the beginning of the book Scout struggles with this in reference to Miss Caroline. At that same time her concept of Boo is a scary bogeyman. By the end, Scout stands on his porch imagining the care and effort he put into the children without their even knowing.

I hope this helps and puts you on track a little.

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