How would you use shaming as part of a punishment for someone who was convicted of driving under the influence of drugs and paralyzing a pastor on his way to church services?

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Although some courts have ruled against the use of shaming as a means of punishing those convicted of crimes, there are examples of judges who include public shaming as a means of reprimanding those who commit crimes such as driving under the influence.

Those convicted of DUI have been ordered...

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Although some courts have ruled against the use of shaming as a means of punishing those convicted of crimes, there are examples of judges who include public shaming as a means of reprimanding those who commit crimes such as driving under the influence.

Those convicted of DUI have been ordered to stand at the site of the accident, holding a sign that reads something like "My name is John Smith and I paralyzed Pastor Andy Johnson while driving under the influence here."

Others have been made to write letters of apology to family members and read those apologies aloud in various places.

A judge once ordered those convicted of DUI to be photographed in handcuffs, and then those photographs were run as ads in a newspaper with a caption along the lines of "If you drive while intoxicated, you could end up like me."

I'm including some links for you below that will help you continue to consider this topic. The idea of public shaming as part of punishment has gained momentum in recent years.

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