How would you paraphrase this?When not submerged in any solution, the Rhoeo discolor leaf's guard cells are neutral. Once submerged on the hypertonic solution, the guard cells shrunk and diffused...

How would you paraphrase this?

When not submerged in any solution, the Rhoeo discolor leaf's guard cells are neutral. Once submerged on the hypertonic solution, the guard cells shrunk and diffused since the liquid in the cytoplasm moved from a greater to a lesser concentration. When the cell was submerged on hypotonic solution, the guard cells bloated because it absorbed the liquid around it.

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I will be the first to bite on this.  I think it's hard to paraphrase expository information such as what you presented.  The challenge is that much of what is present is observational, based on experimentation, and reflects data collection.  You could paraphrase some of it, but realistically, all one would be doing would be changing the syntax or some word choice that is present.  The data findings could be paraphrased, but since it is data collection, I would be leery of changing too much.  For example, look at the first sentence.  I see a possible rephrasing as, "When free of submersion, the Rhoeo discolor leaf's guard cells are neutral."  There is paraphrasing, but I simply don't feel changing the conclusions reached by the data.  They will be the same throughout.  Given the fact that few out here in enotes land actually did the experiment, there should be even more delicacy in altering word choice of what is presented, presuming that what is rendered here is scientifically driven conclusion.  Another example of this would be the last sentence.  "when the cell was submerged in hypotonic solution, the guard cells swelled in size because of the absorption of the surrounding liquid."  Word choice altered, but data collection techniques and finding remain relatively intact.