how would you go about writing a paper about how the NIMS and ICS model can benefit the state-level Homeland Security procedures?As an assistant to a state-level director of Homeland Security, you...

how would you go about writing a paper about how the NIMS and ICS model can benefit the state-level Homeland Security procedures?

As an assistant to a state-level director of Homeland Security, you are asked to write a 5-page paper on how the NIMS and ICS model can benefit the state-level Homeland Security procedures. Focus should include the advantages of common communication and information management systems, the management of resources and multi-agency coordination.

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belarafon's profile pic

belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I'm with #2 as well; it is vital to show how existing models have failed before you can legitimately show the need for change. Without verifiable, documented proof that existing models are inadequate more often than not, you will have a hard time arguing for such widespread alterations.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

To pick up on the suggestion made in #2, you would benefit from investigating and highlighting specific cases where lives were lost because of the lack of communication or intersectoral collaboration. If you could find such a case where people died because of miscommunication between organisations this would greatly help prove the case for change in these areas.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I would emphasize the fact that time is lives in an emergency. If the procedures are already in place, and practiced, then everyone can kick into gear as soon as it is needed. There tend to be a lot of turf wars between organizations, meaning disputes over who can do what and does what where. Having a set communication plan and agreements ahead of time can help everyone get into action more quickly.
vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I would make sure that I knew, as clearly as possible, the features of these models and could explain them as clearly as possible. I would use bullet points as much as possible, since they contribute to writing that is clear, concise, and logical. They also make your writing easier for readers to grasp quickly and clearly.  Here, by the way, is a site that may be of use to you; it was tome!

http://www.aspcapro.org/understanding-nims-and-ics.php

rrteacher's profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The ICS model emphasizes quick response, communication and coordination in the case of disasters, acknowledging that in the midst of disasters, agencies and response personnel may not be working under the same frameworks or for the same people they are accustomed to. I would think that this model would work especially well for incidents involving homeland security. It creates a formalized command structure that basically establishes before hand who will be in charge as different units arrive at the scene of accidents and disasters. As coordination between departments has been identified as a major problem in national security as it relates to terrorism, it seems that this kind of model would be ideal. But what would be necessary would be to identify the specific points at which cooperation breaks down in the homeland security apparatus.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The first thing to do would be to establish why such a model is needed.  In other words, you need to prove that procedures on the state level are inadequate as they currently are.  You should focus on issues of communication and information management that are caused by the need to coordinate among multiple states.  Once you've proved this, you can go on to say how this model will be an improvement.

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