how would you do a plot mountain to this book? have 2 quotes for the setting, 2 for characters, 2 for both the protagonist and antagonist, having 1 quote for the conflict, 3 quotes for the rising...

how would you do a plot mountain to this book? have 2 quotes for the setting, 2 for characters, 2 for both the protagonist and antagonist, having 1 quote for the conflict, 3 quotes for the rising action, 1 for the climax, 3 for the falling, and 1 for the resolution?

Asked on by jenorr19

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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A plot mountain is a visual representation of what you are describing here. The good news is that you already have all of the components needs to "build" your mountain! Attached is a picture of how you should draw and label your mountain. Use the quotes you say you have collected as you see fit based on the parts of the mountain detailed below: 

1) At "base camp," label a box "Exposition." In that box is setting, characters, and a brief explanation of the primary conflict that drives the work (man vs. man, man vs. nature, man vs. society, man vs. himself). 

2) Draw a line that angles upwards. About half way up that line, create a second box labeled "Rising Action." In this box, briefly explain how the conflict intensifies and suspense builds. 

3) Create a "peak." Draw a box on top of the point and label it "Climax." Explain how the conflict has come to a head. 

4) Falling Action. Draw a line downwards on the opposite side of your peak. About halfway down, draw another box.  In this box, explain how the conflict is coming to an end and tensions are lessening. 

5) Resolution. At the other end of your mountain, the opposite "base camp," draw one final box at the bottom. Here, you want to provide evidence that the conflict has been resolved. Important note: Not all conflicts are amicably resolved. For example, death can put an end to an ongoing conflict. 

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