How would you describe your ideal city or town?

Your personal priorities will dictate whether you describe your ideal city or town primarily in terms of planning, architecture, amenities, or inhabitants. You can draw inspiration from towns founded specifically to be ideal communities, such as Port Sunlight, and Welwyn Garden City.

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When it comes to describing your perfect town, it is important to think about your priorities. For example, is it important to you where the town is located, or how many people live in that town? Is it important what kind of facilities your town has or how modern it is? These are all interesting points worth considering when thinking about your ideal town.

However, I would like to focus on a different aspect that might be interesting when thinking about your ideal town: the environment. Sadly, this is often forgotten when people try to think about what their ideal town would look like. Yet, given that more and more people are concerned about the climate, I would suggest to try and imagine a town which does not pose too much of a threat to the environment. For example, you could try to imagine a town that has solar panels on every roof so that the citizens of the town can create their own energy. Perhaps the public transport system in this town is very well designed and affordable to everyone, which means that the residents of this town don't need to use any cars. There might even be cycle paths everywhere for those who wish to travel by bike instead of using public transport. To many, this would sound perfect, as it would be lovely to live in a town that doesn't pollute the air.

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There are so many ways to approach this project that it could be used as a way of finding out about your psyche and values. You might think of the most attractive town or city you have visited and start from there. However, if you have strong views on aesthetics, you may want to design the town you describe from scratch. If the human element of a town appeals to you most, you could think about the type of people you would want to live in your ideal town, and then consider what would make them happiest.

If you need inspiration, you might look at the two links below, both of which are about towns founded to be ideal communities. The first gives information about Port Sunlight, built by William Lever for his factory workers in 1888. At this time, most factory workers lived in cramped, drab accommodation. Lever decided to use some of his wealth to create his ideal community, so he built a beautiful small town, with an art gallery, a museum, and a concert hall. Port Sunlight was one of the inspirations for the "Garden City" movement in the early twentieth century. One of these garden cities was Welwyn, near London, which was founded in 1920. The idea was that garden cities would have more open, green spaces and be less polluted than older cities. You might follow this approach, thinking about what is wrong with cities you know and how they could be improved.

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My ideal city or town would have a low crime rate, a high employment rate, and a solid economy. Since I am a teacher, it is important to me that there is a good school system. I know how crucial that is to the economy and culture of a town. A town also needs amenities, such as walking trails, parks, and shopping.
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Solid economy, job opportunities, good public schools, good public transportation, energy efficient, culturally diverse, tolerant society, cultural events/festivals, and by a beach!

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I actually have the wonderful good fortune to live in my ideal small town, in terms of geography, history, and design. (The local residents leave something to be desired--not the native-born small towners, but the "move ins.")

This gem is located at the top of a 4,000 foot gorge in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina. Because it is a resort town, the population in the summer swells to 25,000. But the year-round residents number fewer than 4,000.

For this reason, I get the best of both worlds. We have a five-star hotel, fabulous restaurants, art galleries, and theater. Yet we also have a little school with small-town sports teams, a pizza place, and a real Main Street with little shops. It really is a wonderful place to live.

We have four seasons, several golf courses, a community recreation center, and a nice hospital.

My ideal city is New York. No further description necessary!

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Great question, a tiny bit difficult to answer. I think that a person's answer to this question would change as they mature and grow older. Someone in their early 20's may want to live in a big city with lots of night clubs and taverns. However, someone who is a little older and married with a family may think that a quiet suburban town with lots of parks and tree-lined streets is ideal.

As a South Floridian, I believe the city where I live ideal. It is an average of 70-80 degrees year round. There is a kaleidoscope of cultures here. I can taste foods from Jamaica, Cuba, Brazil, Germany, Haiti or China without leaving city limits. I also believe that it is this diversity that teaches us tolerance and acceptance.

I live in a suburban area, but if I want to hit a hot night club, I'm less than 15 minuets away from the city. If I decide I want to lay on the beach, I'm no more than a 20 minuet drive from the beaches. I love that there is always a neat festival or concert to attend and if I get bitten by the travel bug, the Bahamas are only a 40 minuet plane ride away and there are always super-cheap fares from South Florida to other destinations.

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