Leiningen Versus the Ants

by Carl Stephenson
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How would you describe Leiningen, the protagonist of the story "Leiningen Versus the Ants"? What is his personality like?

Leiningen in "Leiningen Versus the Ants" can be described as a strong, practical man who's always been very good at solving problems. His mixture of high cunning and administrative ability, combined with outstanding leadership skills, makes him the ideal person to take on and defeat an army of deadly ants.

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More than anything else, Leiningen can be described as a practical man. In his role as owner of a Brazilian plantation, he's been presented with a number of problems, yet he has always managed to deal with them effectively, due, in no small part, to his no-nonsense practicality.

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More than anything else, Leiningen can be described as a practical man. In his role as owner of a Brazilian plantation, he's been presented with a number of problems, yet he has always managed to deal with them effectively, due, in no small part, to his no-nonsense practicality.

Leiningen is also a highly skilled administrator, remarkably adept at handling both things and people. He has the uncanny knack of getting the best out of the men who work for him, utilizing their strengths to fulfill a common purpose. This is an especially useful skill to have when you're running a plantation; it's absolutely essential when you're faced with a rampaging army of ants.

Even when it seems that the ants are winning their epic conflict with humans, Leiningen is still able to command the respect and loyalty of his men. After the first major setback, Leiningen gives his men the opportunity to draw their pay and take off. But not a single one does so; instead, they choose to remain and fight, such is their overriding confidence in their charismatic leader.

Leiningen's acute understanding of human psychology has been put to good use here. He understands that none of the men will want to look like cowards in front of the others and take Leiningen up on his offer.

Finally, one could say that Leiningen is extraordinarily brave. He demonstrates this by risking his life to open the flood-gates that will sweep away the army of ants. Leiningen's not one of those leaders who's prepared to let his men handle all the dangerous tasks. He's right in the thick of the action himself, acting heroically as he fends off the rampaging ant horde.

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