How would you characterize Bradbury's attitude toward technology in the future world of the novel Fahrenheit 451?

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In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury depicts technology as completely consuming citizens' lives and also as a destructive force. Characters like Mildred, Mrs. Phelps, and Mrs. Bowles spend the majority of their lives watching their interactive parlor walls. They completely dismiss their own families and prefer watching meaningless television shows...

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In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury depicts technology as completely consuming citizens' lives and also as a destructive force. Characters like Mildred, Mrs. Phelps, and Mrs. Bowles spend the majority of their lives watching their interactive parlor walls. They completely dismiss their own families and prefer watching meaningless television shows on massive screens in their homes. Bradbury also illustrates how people blow off steam by driving at hundreds of miles per hour and would rather listen to their Seashell earphones than have an enlightening conversation with others. In Bradbury's dystopian society, citizens no longer enjoy the natural environment by walking outside and choose to stay indoors and consume entertainment instead. Bradbury also depicts how technology can be a destructive force by creating the violent Mechanical Hound, which hunts down intellectuals. He also includes the devastating effects of the atomic bomb, which is dropped on the dystopian city at the end of the novel. Overall, Ray Bradbury depicts the negative aspects of technology by portraying it as an all-consuming product as well as a malevolent force.

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In this novel, Bradbury is concerned that technology has come to control people rather than people controlling technology. Technology is supposed to serve people, but in the world he envisions, it damages and dehumanizes humans. Bradbury is fearful of technology and its allure.

Bradbury illustrates this in several ways. First, Clarisse represents old-fashioned human life, before technology came to dominate people. She still likes to walk around in the natural world and enjoys experiencing nature, from the night sky to buttercups. She prefers walking to zooming past her environment in a car. She and her family prefer talking to each other to watching televised view screens. Clarisse, though she does not survive long in Bradbury's dystopia, represents vital, healthy life and stirs up Montag's dissatisfaction with his existence.

In an opposite way, Mildred represents the dangers of immersion in technology. Her life of television-watching has become so empty that she attempts suicide. Yet when she survives her suicide attempt, the allure of the view screens remains too strong, and she is quickly readdicted.

Bradbury cautions us not to let our technology get out of control, but rather to stay in touch with our humanity through real human relationships and through exploring the ideas that are learned through books.

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I would say Bradbury's attitude towards technology is a lot like that of other dystopian novels like 1984 or Brave New World.  He sees technology having two main roles 1) to act as a drug -- making people not really care about what is going on around them and 2) as a destroyer of human beings.

For number one, think about the role of television in this novel.  All anyone wants to do is watch TV.  Millie wants a 4th TV wall and thinks of the characters in her show as real.  Marx said religion was the opiate of the masses.  In this book, TV is.

For number two, think of the mechanical hound and, ultimately, the war planes and bombs.  The hound searches out and destroys people who want to be individuals.  The war technology kills everyone.

So, technology plays a very negative role in the future that this book envisions.

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