How would you agree/disagree with this quote using context from the book?When Janie says "'Yo’ papa and yo’ mama and nobody else can’t tell yuh and show yuh. Two things everybody’s got tuh...

How would you agree/disagree with this quote using context from the book?

When Janie says "'Yo’ papa and yo’ mama and nobody else can’t tell yuh and show yuh. Two things everybody’s got tuh do fuh themselves. They got to go tuh God and they got tuh find out about livin’ fuh theyselves,'" how would you agree/disagree with this statement? Can you give an example?

Asked on by kim8097

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In accord with this statement, critics have argued that from the time she was a young girl seeking love until the end of her life with Tea-Cake, Janie Crawfor  of Their Eyes Were Watching God defines herself only in terms of the man with whom she lives.  While she finds more independence with Joe Sparks than she has with Login, and more with Tea-Cake than with the others, Janie is yet only the woman who belongs to these men. 

Critic Claire Crabtree, who argues that as a feminist, Zora Neale Hurtston did not want Janie "to find fulfillment in a man, but, rather, in her new-found self."  This, Crabtree explains, is why Janie must end Tea-Cake's life.  For, it is only after his death, that she finds out about living for herself as she returns to her hometown and relates her tale.  In this narration, Janie finds her true sense of self; her journey in flashback is her renaissance as a whole woman.

 

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