How would one broadly describe Shelley as a revolutionary poet?

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Percy Bysshe Shelley can be described as revolutionary in several ways, namely in terms of his lifestyle and personal beliefs, in terms of the content of his poetry, in light of his notions of the role of the poet, and in terms of the literary form of his poems. When...

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Percy Bysshe Shelley can be described as revolutionary in several ways, namely in terms of his lifestyle and personal beliefs, in terms of the content of his poetry, in light of his notions of the role of the poet, and in terms of the literary form of his poems.

When still a student at Oxford, Shelley wrote a pamphlet advocating atheism, and a strong politically and religiously radical strand runs through his personal beliefs and writings, include advocacy of revolution as a response to authoritarian regimes. He felt that poets were the unacknowledged legislators of mankind and that poetic inspiration carried the authority previously accorded to mystical religion, a notion revolutionary in being intensely individualistic. His poetic expression of intense emotion in irregular ode forms  could be seen as a revolution against the controlled and decorous use of the heroic couplet by the Augustan poets.

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