How would I rewrite these sentences as reported speech? 1.) I am really hungry. ["John"] 2.) the fish smells awful. ["she"] 3.) I do not like ice cream. ["he"]

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Reported speech is when someone reports or tells us what somebody else said. Technically speaking, it is possible to write reported speech using quotation marks that tell directly what the speaker said. The sentence could be the following sentence: "John said, 'I am really hungry.'"

The other way to give reported speech is to not use quotation marks and use the indirect speech format instead. I believe that this is what the question is more likely asking for. The same sentence would be written like the following sentence: "John said that he was really hungry." Notice that the verb changed from "is" to "was" in order to match the tense of "said." If you are not allowed to do that, then the sentence will read like the following sentence: "John says that he is really hungry." Use the same strategies for the remaining two sentences.

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Reported speech is another name for "indirect" speech. Indirect speech is when someone is reporting on the details of a situation without using the direct quotation of that person. You wouldn't want to use quotation marks around "he was really hungry" and powerranger wouldn't use quotation marks, either. Reported speech or indirect speech both use the third person tense of verb in order to communicate. It is as if someone outside of the situation is reporting the details of another person's situation. The following are the answers to the sentences:

1. John said he is really hungry.

2. She said that the fish smells awful.

3. He said he doesn't like ice cream.

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