How and why have millions of people moved from Asia to the United States since the 1960s? Please provide specific events, people, and court cases, also can you suggest a thesis idea to write on...

How and why have millions of people moved from Asia to the United States since the 1960s?

Please provide specific events, people, and court cases, also can you suggest a thesis idea to write on this topic, please?

Asked on by praysurf99

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justaguide | College Teacher | (Level 2) Distinguished Educator

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The US Immigration Act enacted in 1924 placed a limit on the number of people that were allowed to immigrate to the US based on their nationality. This act was meant to encourage more immigrants from European nations and prevent immigrants from Latin America, Asia and Africa as their was a perception among people that there was a large inflow of people belonging to lower races and that this was adversely affecting the culture and society of the US.

In 1965, a new act was introduced that eliminated the quota system for people from different countries to immigrate to the US. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 placed greater emphasis on the educational background and technical skills of immigrants. Though the total number of immigrants that could enter in a single year was limited and a limit was also placed in the number of people from different countries, it was done with an intention of increasing the cultural diversity of people coming to the US.

A large number of people from Asia immigrated to the US seeking a better standard of living. Many immigrants moved seeking refuge from war and oppressive regimes that controlled the nations. For example, there was a large influx of refugees from Vietnam after the Vietnam War ended and thousands were left on the island seeking refuge from poverty and persecution. This was exacerbated by the Communist regime that took over the nation after the war and millions were sent to prisons for opposing the repressive government.

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