How and why does Jem's opinion of Mrs. Dubose change?

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In chapter 11, Jem and Scout are walking to the store to spend Jem's birthday money when their racist, loudmouth neighbor, Mrs. Dubose, begins yelling insults at them. Mrs. Dubose infuriates Jem when she says, "Your father’s no better than the niggers and trash he works for!," and Scout...

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In chapter 11, Jem and Scout are walking to the store to spend Jem's birthday money when their racist, loudmouth neighbor, Mrs. Dubose, begins yelling insults at them. Mrs. Dubose infuriates Jem when she says, "Your father’s no better than the niggers and trash he works for!," and Scout mentions that her brother immediately turns red at her comment (Lee 105). On their walk back from the store, Jem cannot contain his rage and ends up destroying Mrs. Dubose's camelia bush.

Later that day, Atticus comes home and makes Jem apologize to her. Atticus also forces Jem to read to Mrs. Dubose for two hours each day, including Saturdays, for an entire month as punishment for destroying her camellias. During their reading sessions, Jem notices that Mrs. Dubose gradually begins to stay awake to correct his reading as the days go by and their sessions become longer.

After Jem's punishment is over, Mrs. Dubose passes away and Atticus explains to his son that she was suffering from a chronic illness. He then tells Jem that his reading helped occupy Mrs. Dubose's mind long enough between her morphine doses until she finally broke her habit. Atticus goes on to refer to Mrs. Dubose as the bravest person he's ever met and changes Jem's opinion of his racist neighbor. Jem learns an important lesson to not judge a person by their appearance and views Mrs. Dubose as a courageous, determined woman instead of simply a loudmouth bigot.

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This happens in Chapter 11.

At the start of the chapter, Jem really hates Mrs. Dubose.  She says such horrible things about Atticus that he cannot help but hate her.

But then when he ruins her flowers, Atticus makes him go and read to Mrs. Dubose every day.  He still does not really like her, though.

Then she dies and Atticus says that she was a great lady because of the way she fought her morphine addiction.  Because of this, Jem seems to be rethinking his attitude towards her.

He doesn't exactly come to like her, but at the end of the chapter he's toying with the flower she gave him and thinking.  It's implied that he's thinking about her.

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