Why didn't revolution occur in England during 1848 as it did in other European countries?

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The thing to be aware of is that the Year of Revolutions (1848) was part of a longer sequence of revolutionary clashes which ultimately has its origins in the French Revolution, along with the counterrevolutionary settlement imposed by the Congress of Vienna. The Revolution of 1848 should be understood as...

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The thing to be aware of is that the Year of Revolutions (1848) was part of a longer sequence of revolutionary clashes which ultimately has its origins in the French Revolution, along with the counterrevolutionary settlement imposed by the Congress of Vienna. The Revolution of 1848 should be understood as part of an even longer running series of conflicts between liberals and conservatives (which in the nineteenth century, tends to reflect conflict between those influenced by the revolution and those defending traditional monarchy and power structures).

With this in mind, there are several features to be aware of when you ask the question: why didn't the Year of Revolutions manifest in Britain? For one thing, there is the long term political context to consider, in that the forces of absolutism ultimately failed to take hold in Britain like they had in Continental Europe. This ultimately reaches back into the conflicts between the Stuarts and Parliament. This long-term political context is a factor that should not be underestimated. Furthermore, I would reiterate what the other educator has already said: the British government was willing to enact policies of political reform, in order to head off the threat of far more destructive revolution.

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Revolution did not arise in England in 1848 because the English political system had been more flexible and more willing to change.  Revolution tends to occur in countries where governments are intransigent in the face of demands for change.

In England, the Whigs came to power in 1830 and started to institute reforms that preempted some of the sorts of issues that led to revolutions in Europe in 1848.  To cite two examples, the Whigs enacted the Reform Act of 1832 and repealed the Corn Laws.  The Reform Act allowed more people to vote and be represented in Parliament.  The repeal fo the Corn Laws reduced the price of food and also catered to the free trade ideals of the middle class liberals who were central to the European revolutions.

England's government staved off revolution by changing their system in ways that satsified some of the demands of people who might otherwise have become revolutionary.

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