How were the sectional issues settled in the Missouri Compromise?

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The Missouri Compromise admitted Missouri into the Union as a slave state and Maine into the Union as a free state. All future territory below Missouri's southern border was to become slave states. All future states north of Missouri's southern border were to become free states. This compromise was executed...

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The Missouri Compromise admitted Missouri into the Union as a slave state and Maine into the Union as a free state. All future territory below Missouri's southern border was to become slave states. All future states north of Missouri's southern border were to become free states. This compromise was executed in order to ensure an equal number of slave states and free states in the Senate. Henry Clay created the Missouri Compromise.

Anti-slavery lawmakers were worried that slavery would spread throughout the nation if it was not limited to where it already existed. Pro-slavery lawmakers wanted each new state to decide whether or not to allow slavery within its borders.

The Missouri Compromise provided for one new free state to enter the Union provided that one new slave state entered at the same time. The Compromise came under fire with the Compromise of 1850, when California was admitted as a free state but had to send one pro-slavery senator to Congress. The Missouri Compromise was repealed with the Kansas-Nebraska Act, as Stephen Douglas stated that the people of each new state should be able to vote on slavery.

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